Transitional Nabokov

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Peter Lang, 2009 - Literary Criticism - 311 pages
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This collection of original essays is concerned with one of the most important writers of the twentieth century: Vladimir Nabokov. The book features contributions from both well-established and new scholars, and represents the latest developments in research. The essays all address the possibility of reading Nabokov’s works as operating between categories of various kinds – whether linguistic, formal, historical or national. In doing so, they explore exciting new paradigms for approaching Nabokov’s oeuvre.
The volume brings together a diverse range of critical voices from around the world, to respond to some of the most urgent questions raised about Nabokov’s work. Topics covered include the relationship between his artistic and scientific work, his influences on contemporary fiction, and the development of his aesthetics over his career. Drawing variously on archive research, alternative readings of key texts, and fresh theoretical approaches, this book injects new impetus into Nabokov studies as it continues to evolve as a discipline.
 

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Contents

Nabokovs Fugitive Sense
15
Or Art Literature Science
31
Science and Art in Vladimir Nabokov
55
Translation as a Transitional Process
81
Nabokov Chabon and
99
vi
115
The French Nabokov
135
Deriving Meaning from
153
Nabokovs Magical Objects
185
The Kindness of Cruelty
229
Nabokovs Transition from Game towards Free Play
245
Lolita and
265
No Ghosts Walk
285
Index
305
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

The Editors: Will Norman is Lecturer in American Literature at the University of Kent. He studied English at the University of Nottingham before going on to complete his M.Phil. and D.Phil. at New College, Oxford. His doctoral thesis was on Nabokov, time and history.
Duncan White is writing a doctoral thesis on Nabokov at Linacre College, Oxford. He was awarded a B.A. in English literature from the University of Cambridge and received his M.A. in Russian literature from University College London.

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