Translation and Gender: Translating in the "era of Feminism"

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St. Jerome Pub., 1997 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 114 pages
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The last thirty years of intellectual and artistic creativity in the twentieth century have been marked by gender issues. Translation practice, translation theory and translation criticism have also been powerfully affected by the focus on gender. As a result of feminist praxis and criticism and the simultaneous emphasis on culture in translation studies, translation has become an important site for the exploration of the cultural impact of gender and the gender-specific influence of culture.
Translation and Gender places recent work in translation against the background of the women's movement and its critique of 'patriarchal' language. It explains translation practices derived from experimental feminist writing, the development of openly interventionist translation practices, the initiative to retranslate fundamental texts such as the Bible, translating as a way of recuperating writings 'lost' in patriarchy, and translation history as a means of focusing on women translators of the past.

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Contents

Preface
1
Gender and the Practice of Translation
14
Revising Theories and Myths 3 5
35
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Luise von Flotow is currently Assistant Professor at the University of Ottawa.

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