Travels and Adventures in Southern Africa, Volume 2

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 392 - Lion as he approaches, sometimes up to the very horses' heels, couching every now and then, as if to measure the distance and strength of his enemies. This is the moment to shoot him fairly in the forehead, or some other mortal part. If they continue to wound him ineffectually till he waxes...
Page 394 - ... turned calmly away, and driving the snarling dogs like rats from among his heels, bounded over the adjoining thicket like a cat over a footstool, clearing brakes and bushes twelve or fifteen feet high, as readily as if they had been tufts of grass, and, abandoning the jungle, retreated towards the mountains.
Page 381 - The overmastering effect of the human eye upon the lion has been frequently mentioned, though much doubted by travellers ; but, from my own inquiries among...
Page 392 - The approved mode in such cases is to torment him with dogs till he abandons his covert, and stands at bay in the open plain. The whole band of hunters then march forward together, and fire deliberately, one by one. If he does not speedily fall, but grows angry and turns upon his enemies, they must then stand close in a circle, and turn their horses rearoutward; some holding them fast by the bridles, while the others kneel to take a steady aim at the lion as he approaches, sometimes up to the very...
Page 391 - ... to repair to the place of rendezvous as speedily as possible. In an hour every man of the party (with the exception of two pluckless fellows who were kept at home by the women) appeared ready mounted and armed. We were also reinforced by about a dozen of the
Page 394 - ... mischief. The Hottentots, by taking a circuit between him and the mountain, crossed the stream, and took a position on the top of a precipice overlooking the spot where he stood. Another party of us occupied a position on the other side of the glen; and placing the poor fellow thus between two fires, which confused his attention and prevented his retreat, we kept battering away at him till he fell, unable again to grapple with us, pierced with many wounds.
Page 393 - The danger of our friends however rendered it at the moment too terrible to enjoy either the grand or the ludicrous part of the picture. We expected every instant to see one or more of them torn in pieces, — nor, though the rest of the party were standing within fifty paces with their guns cocked and levelled, durst we fire for their assistance.
Page 391 - The next object was to drive him out of this retreat, in order to attack him in a close phalanx, and with more safety and effect. The approved mode in such cases is to torment him with dogs till he abandons his covert, and stands at bay in the open plain. The whole band of hunters then march forward together, and fire deliberately, one by one. If he does not speedily fall, but grows angry and turns upon his enemies, they must then stand close in a circle, and turn their horses...
Page 404 - ... from off the rocks : but fearing we had taken a wrong direction, it was agreed to return to the wreck, and we accomplished it in three days and a half, where we remained six days, subsisting chiefly on a cask of oatmeal which had been driven on shore ; by drying it in the sun we experienced great relief from it.

Bibliographic information