Travels and adventures in southern Africa, Volume 1

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Page 412 - And to bound away with the eagle's speed, With the death-fraught firelock in my hand, (The only law of the Desert land,) But 'tis not the innocent to destroy, For I hate the huntsman's savage joy. Afar in the Desert I love to ride, With the silent Bush-boy alone by
Page 411 - from man. Afar in the Desert I love to ride, With the silent Bush-boy alone by my side : When the wild turmoil of this wearisome life, With its scenes of oppression, corruption, and strife ; The proud man's frown, and the base man's fear ; And the scorner's
Page 413 - grim Fearfully startles the twilight dim. Afar in the Desert I love to ride, With the silent Bush-boy alone by my side : Away—away in the wilderness vast,* Where the white man's foot hath never pass'd, And the quiver'd Koranna or Bechuan Hath rarely cross'd with his roving clan: • A region of emptiness, howling and drear, Which man hath abandon'd from famine and fear;
Page 413 - brink ; A region of drought, where no river glides, Nor rippling brook with osier'd sides; Nor reedy pool, nor mossy fountain, Nor shady tree, nor cloud-capp'd mountain, Are found—to refresh the aching eye: But the barren earth, and the burning sky,
Page 410 - in the Desert I love to ride, With the silent Hush-boy alone by my side : When the sorrows of life the soul o'ercast, And, sick of the present, I turn to the past ; And the
Page 414 - the heavens and heaved the land,— A "still small voice'' comes through the wild, (Like a father consoling his fretful child), Which banishes bitterness, wrath, and fear—
Page 411 - The home of my childhood; the haunts of my prime; All the passions and scenes of that rapturous time, When the feelings were young, and the world was new, Like the
Page 265 - ground. Instances have been known of some of these prodigious droves passing through flocks of sheep, and numbers of the latter, carried along with the torrent, being lost to their owner, and becoming a prey to the wild beasts. As long as these droughts last, their inroads and depredations continue
Page 413 - that pierce the foot; And the bitter melon, for food and drink, Is the pilgrim's fare, by the Salt Lake's brink ; A region of drought, where no river glides, Nor rippling brook with
Page 411 - good acts undone — Aweary of all that is under the sun,— With that sadness of heart which no stranger may scan, I fly to the Desert

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