Travels in India, Volume 1

Front Cover
Macmillan and Company, 1889 - India
1 Review
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Jean Baptste Tavernier was one of the more remarkable men in a remarkable century. Between 1630 and 1668, Tavernier made six voyages to Persian and India, traveling by his own estimate 180,000 miles.
Tavernier was a gem merchant as well as a talented historian and cultural anthropologist. Any writer discussing this period undoubtedly will footnote the observations of this French adventurer.
Writing at the behest of his patron, Louis XIV, The Six Voyages catalgues Tavernier's, but it was also written as a guide to the French East India Company. The information on what to buy and where can be tedious, but the adventures themselves are marvelous.
Richard W. Wise has authored a historical novel, The French Blue. The novel used The Six Voyages as a template. Readers interested in the unadorned adventures liberally sprinkled with romance will find this historically accurate account a bit less tendious reading.
 

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 109 - JAHANGIR 111 which twenty thousand men worked incessantly ; this is sufficient to enable one to realise that the cost of it has been enormous. It is said that the scaffoldings alone cost more than the entire work, because, from want of wood, they had all to be made of brick, as well as the supports of the arches ; this has entailed much labour and a heavy expenditure.
Page 379 - ... wide. Upon the four feet, which are very massive, and from 20 to 25 inches high, are fixed the four bars which support the base of the throne, and upon these bars are ranged twelve columns, which sustain the canopy on three sides...
Page 382 - ... carats or thereabouts, and of a somewhat yellow water. On both sides of the peacock there is a large bouquet of the same height as the bird, and consisting of many kinds of flowers made of gold inlaid with precious stones.
Page 382 - But in my opinion the most costly point about this magnificent throne is that the twelve columns supporting the canopy are surrounded with beautiful rows of pearls, which are round and of fine water, and weigh from 6 to 10 carats each. At...
Page 109 - on which they have expended twenty-two years, during which twenty thousand men worked incessantly ; this is sufficient to enable one to realise that the cost of it has been enormous. It is said that the scaffoldings alone cost more than the entire work, because, from want of wood, they had all to be made of brick, as well as the supports of the arches ; this has entailed much labour and a heavy expenditure.
Page 382 - ... are surrounded with beautiful rows of pearls, which are round and of fine water, and weigh from 6 to 10 carats each. At 4 feet distance from the throne there are fixed, on either side, two umbrellas, the sticks of which for 7 or 8 feet in height are covered with diamonds, rubies, and pearls. The umbrellas are of red velvet, and are embroidered and fringed all round with pearls.
Page 116 - ... Procedure in such matters varied so little in India from age to age that the best comment on the statement of Megasthenes is afforded by an extract from the travels of Tavernier, the French jeweller who journeyed through India on business in the seventeenth century. He states that at Benares there were ' two galleries where they sell cottons, silken stuffs, and other kinds of merchandise. The majority of those who vend the goods are the workers who have made the pieces, and in this manner foreigners...
Page 156 - ... and go at a fast trot, and about 500 or 600 of them enter the town daily. The King derives from the tax which he places on this tari a very considerable revenue, and it is principally on this account that they allow so many public women, because they are the cause of the consumption of much tari, those who sell it having for this reason their shops in their neighbourhood.
Page 49 - DISTRICT scarfs of them; they also served for the covers of beds, and for handkerchiefs; such as were seen in Europe with those who took snuff. There were other fabrics, which were allowed to remain white, with a stripe or two of gold or silver running the whole length of the piece, and at each of the ends, from the breadth of one inch...
Page 380 - Next in succession, from one side to the other along the length of the bars there are similar crosses, arranged so that in one the ruby is in the middle of four emeralds, and in another the emerald is in the middle and four balass rubies surround it. The emeralds are table-cut, and the intervals between the rubies and emeralds are covered with diamonds, the largest of which do not exceed 10 to 12 carats in weight, all being showy stones, but very flat. There are also in some parts pearls set in gold,...

Bibliographic information