Travels in the Regions of the Upper and Lower Amoor, and the Russian Acquisitions on the Confines of India and China ...

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Hurst and Blackett, 1860 - Amur River (China and Russia) - 570 pages
 

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Page 571 - Perhaps, no English artist was ever before admitted into this enchanted land of history, or provided with the talisman and amulet of a general passport; and well has Mr. Atkinson availed himself of the privilege.
Page 571 - ... taste is gratified by chronicles of sport, the lover of adventure will find a number of perils and escapes to hang over, and the lover of a frank good-humoured way of speech will find the book a pleasant one in every page. Seven years of wandering, thirty-nine thousand five hundred miles of moving to and fro in a wild and almost unknown country, should yield a book worth reading, and they do.
Page 571 - A book of travels which in value and sterling interest must take rank as a landmark -In geographical literature. Its coloured illustrations and wood engravings are of a high order, and add a great charm to the narrative. Mr. Atkinson has travelled where it is believed no European has been before.
Page 571 - Price 2. 2s., elegantly bound- Embellished with upwards of 50 Illustrations, including numerous beautifully coloured plates, from drawings by the Author, and a map. "By virtue alike of its text and...
Page 572 - ... indebted to the Duke of Buckingham for the publication of these volumes— to our thinking the most valuable of the contributions to recent history which he has yet compiled from his family papers. Besides the King, the Duke of Buckingham's canvass is full of the leading men of the day — Castlereagh, Liverpool, Canning, Wellington, Peel, and their compeers.
Page 573 - HISTORY OF THE REIGN OF HENRY IV-, KING OF FRANCE AND NAVARRE.
Page 229 - The guide watched these proceedings with great interest, but when he beheld us enter the gloomy cave he was horrified. Having proceeded about twenty paces, the noise caused by the falling water became fearful, and a damp chilling blast met us. Beyond this point the cavern extended both in width and height, but I could form no idea of its dimensions. We cautiously groped our way on ; and as my eyes gradually became more accustomed to the gloom, I could distinguish the broken floor and the rushing...
Page 52 - ... urged me to be gone. Having resumed my saddle, we rode on for several hours, but there was no change of scene. One spot was so like another, that we seemed to make no progress ; and though we had gone over a considerable distance, nothing could be observed to indicate that we were drawing near a grassy region. No landmark was visible, no rock protruded through the sterile soil ; neither thorny shrub, nor flowering plant, appeared, to indicate the approach to a habitable region. All around was...
Page 571 - ... elegance, instruction and novelty. It is a work of great value, not merely on account of its splendid illustrations, but for the amount it contains of authentic and highly interesting intelligence concerning regions which, in all probability, has never, previous to Mr.
Page 572 - The country is very much indebted to the Duke of Buckingham for the publication of these volumes — to our thinking the most valuable of the contributions to recent history which he has yet compiled from his family papers.

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