Travels of Anacharsis the Younger in Greece: During the Middle of the Fourth Century Before the Christian Æra, Volume 3

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G. G. and J. Robinson, 1796 - Greece
 

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Page 358 - All who have meditated on the art of governing mankind have been convinced that the fate of empires depends on the education of children.
Page 505 - In order to this, let no good man travel at the beginning, in the middle, or at the end of the Sabbath, even to get home to his family.
Page 119 - ... they either themselves repair to the place where they are to receive it, or send thither some person in whom they can confide, and whom they empower to act for them. " The lender has his security, either on the merchandize or the goods of the borrower ; but as the dangers of the sea are in part risked by the former, and the profit of the latter may be very considerable, the interest of money thus lent may rise as high as thirty per cent., more or less, according to the length and hazards of the...
Page 244 - To freemen, the disgrace attending on misconduct is, in my opinion, the most urgent necessity. Or, say, is it your sole ambition to wander through the public places, each inquiring of the other, " What new advices ?" Can any thing be more new, than that a man of Macedon should conquer the Athenians, and give law to Greece ? " Is Philip dead ? No, but in great danger.
Page 120 - ... concealed, and cannot be punished, except by the public opinion, which condemns, but does not sufficiently despise those who are guilty of them. " Commerce increases the circulation of wealth, and this circulation has given birth to the occupation of bankers, which facilitates it still more. A person who is about to make a voyage, or who fears to keep by him too great a sum of money, lodges it in the hands of these bankers, sometimes only as a trust, and without requiring any interest, and sometimes...
Page 243 - When roused by some event ? When forced by some necessity ? What then are we to think of our present condition ? To freemen, the disgrace attending on misconduct is, in my opinion, the most urgent necessity. Or, say, is it your sole ambition to wander through the public places, each inquiring of...
Page 243 - But let us shake off this indolence ! for you see how we are situated ; you see the outrageous arrogance of this man, who does not leave it to your choice whether you shall act, or remain quiet ; but...
Page 118 - ... for treasure. But although the temples discharged one of the offices of banks, by being places of security, yet as they did not grant interest on the money deposited, they did not supersede banks of deposit established by private individuals. At Athens especially, banking was a flourishing trade. " The greater part of the Athenians employ their money in trade, but they are not permitted to lend it for any place but Athens. They receive an interest for the use of it which is not fixed by the laws,...
Page 120 - These extortions are not concealed, and cannot be punished, except by the public opinion, which condemns, but does not sufficiently despise those who are guilty of them. " Commerce increases the circulation of wealth, and this circulation has given birth to the occupation of bankers, which facilitates it still more. A person who is about to make a voyage, or who fears to keep by him too great a sum of money, lodges it in the hands of these bankers, sometimes only as a trust, and without requiring...

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