Treasure Island

Front Cover
Sterling Publishing Company, Inc., Oct 1, 2004 - Juvenile Fiction - 221 pages
6 Reviews
The illustrations for this series were created by Scott McKowen, who, with his wife Christina Poddubiuk, operates Punch & Judy Inc., a company specializing in design and illustration for theater and performing arts. Their projects often involve research into the visual aspects of historical settings and characters. Christina is a theater set and costume designer and contributed advice on the period clothing for the illustrations.

Scott created these drawings in scratchboard an engraving medium which evokes the look of popular art from the period of these stories. Scratchboard is an illustration board with a specifically prepared surface of hard white chalk. A thin layer of black ink is rolled over the surface, and lines are drawn by hand with a sharp knife by scraping through the ink layer to expose the white surface underneath. The finished drawings are then scanned and the color is added digitally.

Sneaky pirates, sailing ships, buried treasure, exotic lands, and murderous mutiny: what could be better to win over even the most reluctant boy reader? Robert Louis Stevenson serves up thrills, chills, and plenty of action in this timeless, and much-admired adventure novel.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

its the best .....

All 6 reviews »

Selected pages

Contents

THE OLD SEA DOG AT THE ADMIRAL BENBOW
3
BLACK DOG APPEARS AND DISAPPEARS
9
THE BLACK SPOT
15
THE SEACHEST
21
THE LAST OF THE BLIND MAN
27
THE CAPTAINS PAPERS
33
THE SEA COOK
39
I GO TO BRISTOL
41
NARRATIVE RESUMED BY JIM HAWKINS THE GARRISON IN THE STOCKADE
112
SILVERS EMBASSY
118
THE ATTACK
124
MY SEA ADVENTURE
131
HOW MY SEA ADVENTURE BEGAN
133
THE EBB TIDE RUNS
139
THE CRUISE OF THE CORACLE
144
I STRIKE THE JOLLY ROGER
150

AT THE SIGN OF THE SPYGLASS
47
POWDER AND ARMS
52
THE VOYAGE
58
WHAT I HEARD IN THE APPLE BARREL
64
COUNCIL OF WAR
70
MY SHORE ADVENTURE
75
HOW MY SHORE ADVENTURE BEGAN
77
THE FIRST BLOW
82
THE MAN OF THE ISLAND
88
THE STOCKADE
95
NARRATIVE CONTINUED BY THE DOCTOR HOW THE SHIP WAS ABANDONED
97
NARRATIVE CONTINUED BY THE DOCTOR THE JOLLYBOATS LAST TRIP
102
NARRATIVE CONTINUED BY THE DOCTOR END OF THE FIRST DAYS FIGHTING
107
ISRAEL HANDS
155
PIECES OF EIGHT
163
CAPTAIN SILVER
169
IN THE ENEMYS CAMP
171
THE BLACK SPOT AGAIN
178
ON PAROLE
184
THE TREASURE HUNTFLINTS POINTER
191
THE TREASURE HUNTTHE VOICE AMONG THE TREES
197
THE FALL OF A CHIEFTAIN
203
AND LAST
209
QUESTIONS QUESTIONS QUESTIONS
215
About the Author
221
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2004)

Novelist, poet, and essayist Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh, Scotland. A sickly child, Stevenson was an invalid for part of his childhood and remained in ill health throughout his life. He began studying engineering at Edinburgh University but soon switched to law. His true inclination, however, was for writing. For several years after completing his studies, Stevenson traveled on the Continent, gathering ideas for his writing. His Inland Voyage (1878) and Travels with a Donkey (1878) describe some of his experiences there. A variety of essays and short stories followed, most of which were published in magazines. It was with the publication of Treasure Island in 1883, however, that Stevenson achieved wide recognition and fame. This was followed by his most successful adventure story, Kidnapped, which appeared in 1886. With stories such as Treasure Island and Kidnapped, Stevenson revived Daniel Defoe's novel of romantic adventure, adding to it psychological analysis. While these stories and others, such as David Balfour and The Master of Ballantrae (1889), are stories of adventure, they are at the same time fine studies of character. The Master of Ballantrae, in particular, is a study of evil character, and this study is taken even further in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886). In 1887 Stevenson and his wife, Fanny, went to the United States, first to the health spas of Saranac Lake, New York, and then on to the West Coast. From there they set out for the South Seas in 1889. Except for one trip to Sidney, Australia, Stevenson spent the remainder of his life on the island of Samoa with his devoted wife and stepson. While there he wrote The Wrecker (1892), Island Nights Entertainments (1893), and Catriona (1893), a sequel to Kidnapped. He also worked on St. Ives and The Weir of Hermiston, which many consider to be his masterpiece. He died suddenly of apoplexy, leaving both of these works unfinished. Both were published posthumously; St. Ives was completed by Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, and The Weir of Hermiston was published unfinished. Stevenson was buried on Samoa, an island he had come to love very much. Although Stevenson's novels are perhaps more accomplished, his short stories are also vivid and memorable. All show his power of invention, his command of the macabre and the eerie, and the psychological depth of his characterization.

Bibliographic information