Treating Alcohol Dependence: A Coping Skills Training Guide

Front Cover
Peter M. Monti
Guilford Press, Aug 12, 2002 - Psychology - 196 pages
Now in a revised and expanded second edition, this book presents a straightforward, multi-session coping skills training program that has been proven effective in helping alcohol-dependent individuals. The volume provides everything needed to implement the program, including a clear theoretical and empirical rationale, step-by-step session guidelines, helpful clinical pointers, and over 40 reproducible client handouts, assessment instruments, and therapist forms. Sessions focus on developing key interpersonal and intrapersonal skills to help participants learn positive strategies for coping with the everyday demands of life and resisting the urge to drink. Updated throughout to reflect current ideas and research findings on addictive behavior change, the protocols in the second edition have been reorganized and streamlined for greater applicability in today's managed care settings. Two entirely new chapters provide guidelines for conducting cue exposure treatment and addressing dual diagnosis issues, with particular attention to tobacco dependence. Of special value for practitioners, the new 8.5" x 11" format makes it easier than ever to reproduce and use the practical materials in the book.
 

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Contents

Introduction Theoretical Rationale and Evidence Base
1
Historical Roots of the Coping Skills Approach to Alcoholism
2
Social Learning Theory of Alcohol Consumption
3
Rationale for Coping Skills Training and Cue Exposure Treatment
8
Evidence Base for Coping Skills Training Approaches
10
Evidence Base foe Cue Exposure Treatment Approaches
14
Implications of Recent Innovations
16
General Treatment Considerations Setting the Stage and Treatment Setting
19
Developing Social Support Networks
92
Developing Social Support Networks
93
Coping Skills Training Part II Intrapersonal Skills
95
Managing Urges to Drink
96
Problem Solving
99
Session Increasing Pleasant Activities
102
Anger Management
104
Managing Negative Thinking
108

Setting the Stage
20
Partial Hospital and Day Treatment Considerations
30
Outpatient and Aftercare Considerations
31
Individual Treatment Considerations
39
Coping Skills Training Part I Interpersonal Skills
42
Structure of the Sessions
43
Introducing Clients to This Approach
44
Nonverbal Communication
45
Introduction to Assertiveness
48
Conversation Skills
50
Giving and Receiving Positive Feedback
53
Listening Skills
55
Giving Constructive Criticism
57
Session Receiving Criticism About Drinking
61
Drink refusal Skills
65
Session Resolving Relationship Problems
66
Session Developing Social Support Networks
70
Nonverbal Communication
73
Nonverbal Communication
74
Introduction to Assertiveness
75
Assertiveness
76
Conversation Skills
77
Conversation Skills
78
Giving and Receiving Positive Feedback
79
Giving and Receiving Positive Feedback
80
Listening Skills
81
Listening Skills
82
Giving Constructive Criticism
84
Giving Constructive Criticism
85
Receiving Criticism about Drinking
86
Receiving Criticism about Drinking
87
Drink Refusal Skills
88
Drink Refusal Skills
89
Resolving Relationship Problems
90
Resolving Relationship Problems
91
Seemingly Irrelevent Decisions
113
Planning for Emergencies
115
Managing Urges to Drink
117
Managing Urges
118
Problem Solving
119
Problem Solving
120
Increasing Pleasant Activities
121
Increasing Pleasant Activities
122
Anger Management
123
Anger Management
124
Managing Negative Thinking
126
Managing Negative Thinking
127
Seemingly Irrelevant Decisions
128
Seemingly Irrelevant Decisions
129
Planning for Emergencies
130
Planning for Emergencies
131
Cue Exposure Treatment with Urge Coping Training
132
Methodological issues in Conducting Cue Exposure
133
Assessments
138
Conducting CET with UrgeSpecific Coping Skills Training
140
Individual Differences in Cue Reactivity
148
Cue Exposure Treatment Rationale
155
GET Individual Session 1
156
GET Individual Sessions after First Session
159
_______s Toolbox for Reducing Urges
162
Dual Diagnosis Issues
163
Depression
166
Anxiety Disorders
168
Psychotic Disorders
169
Personality Disorders
171
Tobacco Dependence Issues
173
References
180
Index
192
Copyright

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Page 182 - Reasons for Tobacco Use and Symptoms of Nicotine Withdrawal Among Adolescent and Young Adult Tobacco Users - United States, 1993.
Page 189 - Rohsenow, DJ, Niaura, RS, Childress, AR, Abrams, DB, & Monti, PM (1990). Cue reactivity in addictive behaviors: Theoretical and treatment implications.

About the author (2002)

Peter M. Monti, PhD, is Professor of Medical Science and Director of the Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies and the Clinical Psychology Internship Consortium at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. He is coeditor of Adolescents, Alcohol, and Substance Abuse and coauthor (with David B. Abrams et al.) of a forthcoming book on nicotine dependence.

Ronald M. Kadden, PhD, is currently Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine. He is an attending psychologist in the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Psychiatric Day Hospital Program at the UConn Health Center.

Damaris J. Rohsenow, PhD, is Professor (Research) of Community Health and Research Director at the Addictive Behaviors Lab, Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University. She is also a Research Career Scientist at the Providence VA Medical Center in Providence, Rhode Island.

Ned L. Cooney, PhD, is Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine and Director of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Programs at the Newington Campus of the VA Connecticut Healthcare System.

David B. Abrams, PhD, is Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown Medical School/The Miriam Hospital, where he is also Director of the Centers for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine.

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