Treating Self-Injury, Second Edition: A Practical Guide

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Guilford Press, Jul 2, 2012 - Psychology - 413 pages
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This trusted practitioner resource is acclaimed for its clear, compassionate, and hopeful approach to working with clients who self-injure. Barent Walsh provides current, evidence-based knowledge about the variety and causes of self-injurious behavior, its relationship to suicidality, and how to assess and treat it effectively. Illustrated with detailed case examples, chapters review a wide range of cognitive-behavioral interventions. Essential guidance is provided on tailoring the intensity of intervention to each client's unique needs. Walsh is joined by several colleagues who have contributed chapters in their respective areas of expertise. Reproducible assessment tools and handouts can be downloaded and printed in a convenient 8 1/2" x 11" size.

New to This Edition*Incorporates up-to-date research and clinical advances.*Now uses a stepped-care framework to match interventions to client needs.*Chapters on the relationship between suicide and self-injury, formal assessment, family therapy, and residential treatment for adolescents.*Special-topic chapters on the "choking game," foreign body ingestion, multiple self-harm behaviors, and self-injury in correctional settings.

 

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Contents

Part IDefinition and Contexts for SelfInjury
1
Chapter 1Definition and Differentiation from Suicide
3
Chapter 2The Relationship between SelfInjury and Suicide
20
Chapter 3An Overview of Direct and Indirect SelfHarm
27
Chapter 4Major Groups in Which SelfInjury Occurs
37
Chapter 5Body Piercings Tattoos Brandings Scarifications and Other Forms of Body Modification
53
Chapter 6A Biopsychosocial Model for SelfInjury
59
A SteppedCare Model
73
Step 4
243
Chapter 17Treating Persons with Multiple SelfHarm Behaviors
245
Chapter 18Residential Treatment Targeting SelfInjury and Suicidal Behavior in Adolescents
253
Part IIISpecialized Topics
269
A Guide for Therapists and Other Caregivers
271
Chapter 20Social Contagion and SelfInjury
280
Chapter 21A Protocol for Managing SelfInjury in School Settings
293
Chapter 22Asphyxial RiskTaking the Choking Game
305

Step 1
77
Chapter 7Initial Therapeutic Responses
79
Chapter 8Formal Assessment of SelfInjury
88
Chapter 9CognitiveBehavioral Assessment
99
Chapter 10Contingency Management
134
Step 2
145
Chapter 11Replacement Skills Training
147
Chapter 12Cognitive Treatment
171
Chapter 13Family Therapy
186
Chapter 14Psychopharmacological Treatment
195
Step 3
205
Chapter 15Body Image Work
207
Chapter 16Prolonged Exposure or Cognitive Restructuring for Treating PTSD and Related SelfInjury
227
Chapter 23Understanding Managing and Treating ForeignBody Ingestion
314
Chapter 24SelfInjury in Correctional Settings
325
Chapter 25Treating Major SelfInjury
335
Afterword
351
Appendix ABreathing Manual
355
Appendix BBody Attitudes Scale BAS
364
Appendix CClinical Scales to Assess SelfInjury
366
Appendix DHelpful Websites Related to SelfInjury
371
Appendix EBill of Rights for People Who SelfHarm
373
References
377
Index
397
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Barent W. Walsh, PhD, is Executive Director of The Bridge of Central Massachusetts in Worcester and Teaching Associate in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. The Bridge specializes in implementing evidence-based practice models according to protocol in public-sector settings. It comprises over 40 programs serving persons with mental health or developmental disability challenges, including special education; residential treatment; wraparound services; supported housing services; a drop-in center for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender teens; and a program for homeless people. A recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Massachusetts chapter of the National Association of Social Workers, Dr. Walsh has worked with self-injuring persons for over 40 years and has conducted research, written extensively, and presented internationally on self-injury. He has consulted on this topic at numerous schools, outpatient clinics, group homes, psychiatric hospitals, and correctional facilities, and has also served on the clinical and research faculties of the Simmons and Boston College Schools of Social Work.

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