Trump: The Art of the Comeback

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Times Books, 1997 - Biography & Autobiography - 244 pages
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Trump's story begins when many real estate moguls went belly-up in what he calls the Great Depression of 1990. Trump reveals how he renegotiated millions of dollars in bank loans and survived the recession, paving the way for a resurgence, during which he built the most successful casino operation in Atlantic City, broke ground on one of the biggest and most lucrative development projects ever undertaken in New York City, and outsmarted one of South America's richest men for rights to the Miss Universe pageant.
Blunt, outrageous, smart as hell, and full of hilarious stories--check out his chapter "The Art of the Prenuptial Agreement"--Trump tells it like it is: the women in his life; the wild and woolly deals; negotiating tactics; his investment philosophy; and his strategy for success or coming back from adversity.
Whether you love him or hate him, one thing is certain about Donald Trump: He is a true American original, with great instincts and billion-dollar dreams. "The Art of the Comeback" is Trump at his best--unpredictable, irreverent, and irrepressible.

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Trump: the art of the comeback

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Six years ago real estate developer Trump (Trump: The Art of the Deal, LJ 2/15/88) was several billion dollars in debt, owing in part, he says, to his complacency and the Tax Reform Act of 1986. Now ... Read full review

About the author (1997)

Donald J. Trump is president and chief executive officer of the Trump Organization.  He lives in New York City.  He is the author of two previous bestselling books, Trump: The Art of the Deal and  Trump: Surviving at the Top.

The co-author Kate Bohner, began her career in the mergers and acquisitions department at Lazard Freres after studying business and international studies at the University of Pennsylvania.  She is a graduate of the Columbia  University  Journalism School where she received a Reader's Digest Literary Foundation Fellowship.  She wrote for Forbes for three years and is currently a correspondent fro CNBC.

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