Turner's Liber Studiorum: A Description and a Catalogue

Front Cover
Macmillan and Company, 1878 - Engraving - 207 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 14 - Studiorum, and observe how the imagination can concentrate all this, and infinitely more, into one moment. No far forest country, no secret paths, nor cloven hills, nothing but a gleam of pale horizontal sky, that broods over pleasant places far away, and sends in, through the wild overgrowth of the thicket, a ray of broken daylight into the hopeless pit. No flaunting plumes nor brandished lances, but stern purpose in the turn of the crestless hclmet, visible victory in the drawing back of the prepared...
Page 41 - This sky is much better, but do not understand the spots amongst the light part. A slight indication of a ray of bursting light under the bridge would improve that part, and a few sharp white touches upon the leaves marked X , because they are now two black spots without connection with the stems of the trees. Put a shade upon the top of the bridge, and under at the top of the arch.
Page 141 - Apuleius, learns from the swain the cause of his metamorphosis. One of the peasants is pointing to the name APULEIUS carved in the bark of the tree. Apuleius was a distinguished philosopher and advocate of the second century of our era, and was the author of the celebrated romance entitled " The Metamorphosis, or the Golden Ass," in which he represents himself as transformed into an ass.
Page xii - Turner would be concentrated on this one point — their tonality. He would be anxious to ascertain how far this great master of tonality had overcome the difficulty of it in etching ; and if with this feeling he came across a collection of Turner's plates, he would be much disappointed. Turner was a first-rate etcher au trait, but he did not trust himself to carry out chiaroscuro in etching, and habitually resorted to mezzotint for his light and shade. His etchings were always done from the beginning...
Page 129 - Turner, with that love for water which characterises all true landscape painters, has assigned as the place of meeting one of those sweet little solitudes which from time immemorial have been dear to poets and lovers. She is seated on the gently sloping ground at the edge of a shining pool ; the water has been lately divided by stones which to the left of the etching rise visibly above its surface, but it pauses at the feet of Hesperie where she sits as she thinks alone. ^Esacus still unperceived...
Page 57 - So far of what each painter chooses to draw. But do not fail also to consider the spirit in which it is drawn. Observe, that though all this ruin has befallen Stanfield's mill, Stanfield is not in the least sorry for it. On the contrary, he is delighted, and evidently thinks it the most fortunate thing possible. The owner is ruined, doubtless, or dead, but his mill forms an admirable object in our view of Brittany . . . Not so, Turner.
Page 129 - Over the head of ./Esacus, and between the trunks of the two principal trees, is a glade so full of tender passages of light, which are chiefly due to the work in mezzotint, that this plate may be taken as a transcendent example of Turner's power in both arts. The brilliant freedom of the etched branches, the mellow diffusion of light in the tinted glade, are both achievements of the k*ind which permanently class an artist.
Page 136 - I suppose the boy Turner to have regarded the religion of his city also from an external intellectual standingpoint. What did he see in Maiden Lane ? Let not the reader be offended with me ; I am willing to let him describe, at his own pleasure, what Turner saw there ; but to me, it seems to have been this. A religion maintained occasionally, even the whole length of the lane, at point of constable's staff ; but, at other times, placed under the custody of the beadle, within certain black and unstately...
Page 118 - I wish the reader to fix his attention for a moment on these two great characters of the pine, its straightness and rounded perfectness ; both wonderful, and in their issue lovely, though they have hitherto prevented the tree from being drawn. I say, first, its straightness. Because we constantly see it in the wildest scenery, we are apt to remember only as characteristic examples of it those which have been disturbed by violent accident or disease. Of course such instances are frequent. The soil...
Page viii - An etched shade, as the reader is already aware, is produced by lines which are drawn with a point on a varnished plate (the point removing the varnish where it passes), and afterwards bitten in with aquafortis; but a shade in mezzotint is left, and the passages in mezzotint which are perfectly white are the places where the plate has been scraped till the bur is all gone, and then polished with a burnisher. When etching and mezzotint are used in combination on the same plate, the etching is done...

Bibliographic information