Twelve Years a Slave

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LSU Press, Apr 1, 1968 - Literary Criticism - 312 pages
3 Reviews

Solomon Northup was a free man, the son of an emancipated Negro Slave. Until the spring of 1841 he lived a simple, uneventful life with his wife and three children in Upstate New York. Then, suddenly, he fell victim to a series of bizarre events that make this one of the most amazing autobiographies ever written.

Northup accepted an offer from two strangers in Saratoga, New York, to catch up with their traveling circus and play in its band. But when the chase ended, Northup had been drugged, beaten, and sold to a slave trader in Washington, D.C. Subsequently, he was shipped to New Orleans, where he was purchased by a planter in the Red River region of Louisiana. For the next twelve years Northup lived as a chattel slave under several masters. He might well have died a slave, except for another set of bizarre circumstances which enabled him to get word to his family and finally regain his freedom.

These elements alone -- the kidnapping, enslavement, and rescue -- are sufficient for a sensational story. But Northup provides more. He was a shrewd observer of people and events. His memory was remarkable. He described cultivation of cotton and sugar in the Deep South. He detailed the daily routine and general life of the Negro slave. Indeed, he vividly portrayed the world of slavery -- from the underside.

Originally published in 1853, Northup's autobiography is regarded as one of the best accounts of American Negro slavery ever written by a slave. It is reprinted in full here for the first time, as the initial volume in The Library of Southern Civilization.

Northup's account has been carefully checked by the editors and has been found to be remarkably accurate. To his own narrative of a long and tragic adventure, Professors Eakin and Logsdon have added significant new details about Northup and the plantation country where he spent most of his time as a slave. Heretofore unknown information about the capture and trial of Northup's kidnappers has been included, adding still another fascinating episode to an already astounding story.

 

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12 Years a Slave is a 2013 British-American historical drama film and an adaptation of the 1853 slave narrative memoir Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup, a New York State-born free African American man who was kidnapped in Washington, D.C. in 1841 and sold into slavery. Northup worked on plantations in the state of Louisiana for twelve years before his release. The first scholarly edition of Northup's memoir, co-edited in 1968 by Sue Eakin and Joseph Logsdon, carefully retraced and validated the account and concluded it to be accurate.[6]
This is the third feature film directed by Steve McQueen. The screenplay was written by John Ridley. Chiwetel Ejiofor stars as Solomon Northup. Michael Fassbender, Benedict Cumberbatch, Paul Dano, Paul Giamatti, Lupita Nyong'o, Sarah Paulson, Brad Pitt, and Alfre Woodard are all featured in supporting roles. Principal photography took place in New Orleans, Louisiana, from June 27 to August 13, 2012. The locations used were four historic antebellum plantations: Felicity, Bocage, Destrehan, and Magnolia. Of the four, Magnolia is nearest to the actual plantation where Northup was held.
12 Years a Slave received widespread critical acclaim, and was named the best film of 2013 by several media outlets. It proved to be a box office success, earning over $178 million on a production budget of $18 million. The film won three Academy Awards: Best Picture (becoming the first film made by a black director or producer to receive the award), Best Supporting Actress for Nyong'o, and the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay for Ridley.[7][8] It was awarded the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Drama, and the British Academy
 

Review: Twelve Years a Slave

User Review  - Aaron Garrido - Goodreads

For a required reading, it was immersive and striking. More people should read this. Read full review

Contents

val in Richmond Goodin and his Slave Pen Robert
21
51
33
CHAPTER VII
61
CHAPTER VIII
75
CHAPTER IX
86
CHAPTER X
97
CHAPTER XI
108
CHAPTER XII
122
CHAPTER XVI
170
CHAPTER XVII
180
CHAPTER XVIII
192
ONiel the Tanner Conversation with Aunt Phebe overheard
201
CHAPTER XX
216
CHAPTER XXI
225
CHAPTER XXII
243
APPENDICES
254

CHAPTER XIII
133
CHAPTER XIV
145
CHAPTER XV
159

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About the author (1968)

Sue Eakin (1918-2009) taught history at Louisiana State University in Alexandria.

Joseph Logsdon (1938-2000) was an assistant professor of history at Louisiana State University in New Orleans.

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