Twister: The Science of Tornadoes and the Making of a Natural Disaster Movie

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Simon and Schuster, 1996 - Nature - 202 pages
Award-winning science writer takes you where only the bravest souls have ventured, and survived - into the frightening path of these violent twisters. He also gives you a behind-the-scenes look at the making of the Warner Bros. film from the creators of Jurassic Park and the director of Speed. In collaboration with the makers of the film, Davidson explores the many challenges faced by the producers, the stars, the director and the special effects experts who re-created this wild, mysterious experience. Through fascinating interviews, you'll come to understand just how these incredible storms came to life on the big screen.
Of all the atmospheric storms, tornadoes are the fiercest, concentrating as much energy into a small space and time as numerous atomic-bomb blasts, and posing grave danger to the scientists who study this incredible phenomenon. Swirling at speeds of up to three hundred miles per hour and spewing debris as far as two hundred files away, a writhing tornado leaves behind a trail of tragedy: lives are ruined, families are wiped out, and entire towns are erased from the face of the Earth.
Enhanced with spectacular close-up photographs and easy-to-grasp graphics, TWISTER offers an enthralling profile of these powerful storms, including an in-depth look at the leading tornado-monitoring project, VORTEX. You'll discover a fascinating world of science and mystery, where storm chasers risk their lives for their work. And you'll hear from those who have experienced close encounters with tornadoes as they tell their unforgettable stories. Embark on a journey filled with terror, grief, triumph, and hope -- hope that scientists will soon be able to reliably predict, and in the distant future control, nature's most devastating force: tornadoes.
 

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Twisters are bornout of bossoneva condensation in between positive and negative opposite spinning spirals formed during June-july simulataed by solar magnetic field resonance thus simulating the two domains.The cross polarised twisters can be artificially created out of Xenon gas-bismuth-rubidium by laser cooled seprations cross polarised at the middle resonance that resonate between posive and negative pressures ejection a downward cross polarised twisters which can be used in Wind mills for electricity production using aerogenerators.
Bossenova twisters by laser simulations using xenon gas-reg
Bossonova twisters:
Atom interferometers have been made before, but the NIST technique introduces some new twists. The researchers trap about 20,000 ultracold rubidium atoms with optical lattices, a lacework of light formed by three pairs of infrared laser beams that sets up an array of energy wells, shaped like an egg carton, that trap the atoms. The lasers are arranged to create two horizontal lattices overlapping like two mesh screens, one twice as fine as the other in one dimension. If one atom is placed in each site of the wider lattice, and those lasers are turned off while the finer lattice is activated, then each site is split into two wells, about 400 nanometers apart. Under the rules of the quantum world, the atom doesn't choose between the two sites but rather assumes a superposition, located in both places simultaneously. Images reveal a characteristic pattern as the two parts of the single superpositioned atom interfere with each other. (The effect is strong enough to image because this is happening to thousands of atoms simultaneously—see image
Atom interferometers have been made before, but the NIST technique introduces some new twists. The researchers trap about 20,000 ultracold rubidium atoms with optical lattices, a lacework of light formed by three pairs of infrared laser beams that sets up an array of energy wells, shaped like an egg carton, that trap the atoms. The lasers are arranged to create two horizontal lattices overlapping like two mesh screens, one twice as fine as the other in one dimension. If one atom is placed in each site of the wider lattice, and those lasers are turned off while the finer lattice is activated, then each site is split into two wells, about 400 nanometers apart. Under the rules of the quantum world, the atom doesn't choose between the two sites but rather assumes a superposition, located in both places simultaneously. Images reveal a characteristic pattern as the two parts of the single superpositioned atom interfere with each other. (The effect is strong enough to image because this is happening to thousands of atoms simultaneously—see image.)
Everything changes when two atoms are placed in each site of the wider lattice, and those sites are split in two. The original atom pair is now in a superposition of three possible arrangements: both atoms on one site, both on the other, and one on each. In the two cases when both atoms are on a single site, they interact with each other, altering the interference pattern—an effect that does not occur with light. The imbalance among the three arrangements creates a strobe-like effect. Depending on how long the atoms are held in the lattice before being released to interfere, the interference pattern flickers on (with stripes) and off (no stripes). A similar collapse and revival of an interference pattern was seen in similar experiments done earlier in Germany, but that work did not confine a pair of atoms to a single pair of sites. The NIST experiments allowed researchers to measure the degree to which they had exactly one or exactly two atoms in a single site, and to controllably make exactly two atoms interact. These are important capabilities for making a quantum computer that stores information in individual neutral atoms.
"The disks are sized to create a “whispering gallery” effect in which infrared light at about 900 nanometers circulates around the disk’s rim. That resonant region contains
 

Contents

Ground Zero
1
A World Destroyed
34
American Gothic
57
To Destroy Tornadoes Before They Destroy Us
84
Into the Whirlwind
122
On the Road
142
The White Plague and Global Warming
157
Putting Tornadoes to Work m
163
No Mans Land
168
Afterword
189
Recommended Sources
202
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