Two Colored Women with the American Expeditionary Forces

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Brooklyn eagle Press, 1920 - World War, 1914-1918 - 256 pages
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Thank you ladies for this great book. I found my great-grand uncle - Chaplain George Stark. Wow, so great to see African Americans serving proudly in World War I.

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Page 75 - All the dead mass, and drifts Tempest and falling brand Over a ruined land, — So still and orderly, Arm to arm, knee to knee, Waiting the great event, Stands the black regiment. Down the long dusky line Teeth gleam and eyeballs shine; And the bright bayonet, Bristling and firmly set, Flashed with a purpose grand, Long ere the sharp command Of the fierce rolling drum Told them their time had come, Told them what work was sent For the black regiment. "Now...
Page 76 - Ah ! and they meant the word, Not as with us 'tis heard, Not a mere party shout : They gave their spirits out ; Trusted the end to God, And on the gory sod Rolled in triumphant blood. Glad to strike one free blow, Whether for weal or woe ; Glad to breathe one free breath, Though on the lips of death. Praying — alas ! in vain ! — That they might fall again, So they could once more see That burst to liberty ! This was what " freedom
Page 40 - The torches whose flame is brightest are borne by the gallant men at the front, and by the gallant women whose husbands and lovers, whose sons and brothers are at the front. These men are high of soul, as they face their fate on the shell-shattered earth, or in the skies above or in the waters beneath; and no less high of soul are the women with torn hearts and shining eyes; the girls whose...
Page 75 - DARK as the clouds of even, Banked in the western heaven, Waiting the breath that lifts All the dead mass, and drifts Tempest and falling brand Over a ruined land, — So still and orderly, Arm to arm, knee to knee, Waiting the great event, Stands the black regiment. Down the long...
Page 94 - These truly are the Brave, These men who cast aside Old memories, to walk the blood-stained pave Of Sacrifice, joining the solemn tide That moves away, to suffer and to die For Freedom — when their own is yet denied!
Page 107 - Has one black, treason-guided hand Ever against that flag been raised. Then should we speak but servile words, Or shall we hang our heads in shame ? Stand back of new-come foreign hordes, And fear our heritage to claim? No ! stand erect and without fear, And for our foes let this suffice — We've bought a rightful sonship here, And we have more than paid the price.
Page 77 - Though on the lips of death; Praying, — alas! in vain! — • That they might fall again, So they could once more see That burst to liberty! This was what "freedom" lent To the black regiment. Hundreds on hundreds fell; But they are resting well; Scourges and shackles strong Never shall do them wrong. Oh, to the living few, Soldiers, be just and true! Hail them as comrades tried; Fight with them side by side; Never, in field or tent, Scorn the black regiment!
Page 76 - Driving their lords like chaff, In the guns' mouths they laugh ; Or at the slippery brands Leaping with open hands, Down they tear man and horse, Down in their awful course ; Trampling with bloody heel Over the crashing steel, All their eyes forward bent, Rushed the Black Regiment. " Freedom !" their battle-cry — " Freedom ! or leave to die !" Ah ! and they meant the word.
Page 46 - It should be well known to all colored officers and men that no useful purpose is served by such acts as will cause the 'color question' to be raised. It is not a question of legal rights, but a question of policy, and any policy that tends to bring about a conflict of the races, with its resulting animosities, is prejudicial to the military interest of the colored race.
Page 107 - ... that have been won, Our arms have strained, our backs have burned, Bent bare beneath a ruthless sun. That Banner which is now the type Of victory on field and flood— Remember, its first crimson stripe Was dyed by Attucks' willing blood. And never yet has come the cry— When that fair flag has been assailed— For men to do, for men to die, That we have faltered or have failed. We've helped to bear it, rent and torn, Through many a hot-breath'd battle breeze Held in our hands, it has been borne...

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