Tyendinaga Tales

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, 1998 - Social Science - 78 pages
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From the introduction: "Folk-tales are the verbal account of the world view and way of life of a people. They hold a special importance when the people lack a formal system of writing. For a thousand years the philosophy, religion, morals, customs, and ideas of the Iroquoian people were perpetuated by means of the spoken word. Folklore may explain the origin of man, animals, plants, and the world. Codes of behaviour, ethics, and social mores are validated in accounts which describe, for example, heroic or malicious deeds. Story- telling was used to socialize and instruct young people and acted as a social cohesive for the whole group." The tales which Rona Rustige has collected contain many folkloric motifs which relate them to other Iroquoian literatures. In the context of this body of Iroquoian folklore the tales take on a broader significance and their preservation allows for future systematic study.
 

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Contents

The Earth World
6
Twins Sapling and Flint
18
The Woman in the Moon
21
The youngest brother with
27
The origin of the Big Dipper
34
Trading Teeth with the Beaver
35
The eagle and the hermit thrush
42
The Rabbit
44
The bat
52
The Gift of the Great Spirit
57
Onenhste9s grief
59
Snow snake
68
Acknowledgments
75
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About the author (1998)

Rustige is curator of Glanmore National Historic Site in Belleville, Ontario and the Museum of Health Care for Eastern Ontario Kingston.

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