Ubik

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Apr 17, 2012 - Fiction - 224 pages
60 Reviews
“From the stuff of space opera, Dick spins a deeply unsettling existential horror story, a nightmare you’ll never be sure you’ve woken up from.”—Lev Grossman, Time

Glen Runciter runs a lucrative business—deploying his teams of anti-psychics to corporate clients who want privacy and security from psychic spies. But when he and his top team are ambushed by a rival, he is gravely injured and placed in “half-life,” a dreamlike state of suspended animation. Soon, though, the surviving members of the team begin experiencing some strange phenomena, such as Runciter’s face appearing on coins and the world seeming to move backward in time. As consumables deteriorate and technology gets ever more primitive, the group needs to find out what is causing the shifts and what a mysterious product called Ubik has to do with it all.

“More brilliant than similar experiments conducted by Pynchon or DeLillo.”—Roberto Bolaño
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - brikis98 - LibraryThing

There are a few interesting concepts and twists in the book, but when it comes to characters, the story falls flat. Most of them are flat and no one develops or changes in any way. You really have no ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - krizia_lazaro - LibraryThing

My first Philip K. Dick and hopefully not my last. This was really exciting but not really satisfying. Is their an Ubik part 2 because I want to read more about Joe Chip! It was funny, action packed and philosophical. I love it! Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

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36
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151
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167
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Back Cover
229

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Spine
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Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Over a writing career that spanned three decades, PHILIP K. DICK (1928–1982) published 36 science fiction novels and 121 short stories in which he explored the essence of what makes man human and the dangers of centralized power. Toward the end of his life, his work turned toward deeply personal, metaphysical questions concerning the nature of God. Eleven novels and short stories have been adapted to film, notably Blade Runner (based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?), Total Recall,Minority Report, and A Scanner Darkly. The recipient of critical acclaim and numerous awards throughout his career, Dick was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2005, and in 2007 the Library of America published a selection of his novels in three volumes. His work has been translated into more than twenty-five languages.

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