Ukraine: The Bradt Travel Guide

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Bradt Travel Guides, 2007 - Travel - 440 pages
There has never been a better time to travel to Ukraine with visas no longer necessary for most tourists. Visitors to the country will discover traditional churches, monasteries, and sacred sites providing a contrast to the notorious, but compelling, landmark of Chernobyl. Sites can easily be explored by rail, river cruise, or sea ferry, and also on foot--the ideal way to take in rustic villages of old-world eastern Europe. Features include: *Detailed coverage of new hotels and restaurants *A region-by-region guide to the provinces, including the stunning Crimean peninsula *Kiev--the birthplace of Slavic civilization--in fresh detail *Thorough language section in both Russian and Ukraine
 

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In general it is a pretty good guide. The maps are not that good.
Also, the author incorrectly states that, in the Orthodox religion the people "pray to, and worship the Icons". This is not the case. Icons are venerated, but never worshiped, and are never "prayed to".

Contents

Chapter
7
The Ukrainians
35
Preparations
51
Travelling in Ukraine
77
PART TWO THE GUIDE
105
Chapter 12
426
Index
434
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Andrew Evans spent two years living in Ukraine shortly after the country gained its independence. Since then he has dedicated himself to the study of Ukrainian folk culture, music, dance, art, and religion, writing articles and traveling throughout the country.

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