Ukridge

Front Cover
Random House, Jul 28, 2009 - Fiction - 288 pages
3 Reviews

A P.G. Wodehouse collection

Money makes the world go round for Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge - and when there isn't enough of it, the world just has to spin a bit faster.

Ever on the lookout for a quick buck, a solid gold fortune, or at least a plausible little scrounge, the irrepressible Ukridge gives con men a bad name. Looking like an animated blob of mustard in his bright yellow raincoat, he invests time, passion and energy (but seldom actual cash) in a series of increasingly bizarre money-making schemes. Finance for a dog college? It's yours. Shares in an accident syndicate? Easily arranged. Promoting a kind-hearted heavyweight boxer? A snip.

Poor Corky Corcoran, Ukridge's old school chum and confidant, trails through these pages in the ebullient wake of Wodehouse's most disreputable but endearing hero and hopes to escape with his shirt at least.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - SebastianHagelstein - LibraryThing

A collection of short stories about the character Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge, who is always coming up with plots for self benefit. Every story is extremely funny and it's hard to choose a favorite. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - losloper - LibraryThing

If Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge had a fiver for every dodgy scheme he has ever floated, he would be a rich man indeed. In these ten stories he tries every way of making money, from writing ... Read full review

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About the author (2009)

Pelham Grenville Wodehouse (always known as ‘Plum’) wrote more than ninety novels and some three hundred short stories over 73 years. He is widely recognised as the greatest 20th-century writer of humour in the English language.

Perhaps best known for the escapades of Bertie Wooster and Jeeves, Wodehouse also created the world of Blandings Castle, home to Lord Emsworth and his cherished pig, the Empress of Blandings. His stories include gems concerning the irrepressible and disreputable Ukridge; Psmith, the elegant socialist; the ever-so-slightly-unscrupulous Fifth Earl of Ickenham, better known as Uncle Fred; and those related by Mr Mulliner, the charming raconteur of The Angler’s Rest, and the Oldest Member at the Golf Club.

In 1936 he was awarded the Mark Twain Prize for ‘having made an outstanding and lasting contribution to the happiness of the world’. He was made a Doctor of Letters by Oxford University in 1939 and in 1975, aged 93, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II. He died shortly afterwards, on St Valentine’s Day.

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