Ultimate prizes

Front Cover
Knopf, Oct 14, 1989 - Fiction - 387 pages
3 Reviews
The third in Susan Howatch's Church of England novels, ULTIMATE PRIZES begins in 1942 with the world at war, as narrator and archdeacon Nevill Aysgarth finds himself falling into a hopeless obsession over Dido Tallent, beautiful celebrity, and finds himself pursuing her through a swamp of guilt and the destruction of his valued moral compass.... From the Paperback edition.

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User Review  - SueinCyprus - LibraryThing

Third in the Starbridge series about Church of England ministers in the middle of the 20th century. This book is written from the perspective of Neville, an Archdeacon, whose habit of 'ringing down ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - justchris - LibraryThing

The new book I just finished was Ultimate Prizes by Susan Howatch. This is not a book or an author I would ever have picked on my own. This book was a reciprocal loan after I sent some of murder ... Read full review

Contents

PART
161
PART THREE
333
Authors Note
385
Copyright

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About the author (1989)

Susan Howatch is an author who writes in a variety of genres, including mystery, romance, and historical fiction. Born on July 14, 1940 in England, she graduated from the University of London in 1961 and served as a law clerk and secretary in the early 1960s before turning to writing full-time. Howatch first gained attention in 1965 with the publication of The Dark Shore, the first of several mystery novels. Replete with Gothic figures, this, and other works, such as April's Grave, feature sassy heroines falling headlong into murder, mayhem, and often romance. With the publication of Penmarric in 1971, Howatch established herself as a multitalented writer, creating modern characters based on historical figures. She also completed the six-volume Starbridge series which revolves around the Anglican Church and several clergy members. With these books, she gained wider critical acclaim as a serious writer posing important theological and philosophical questions.