Ultrasonics: Fundamentals, Technology, Applications, Second Edition, Revised and Expanded

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CRC Press, Sep 2, 1988 - Science - 602 pages
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Maintaining the features that made the first edition of this book a bestseller, Ultrasonics: Fundamentals, Technology, Applications, Second Edition describes the basic principles, theoretical background, and a wide range of applications of ultrasonic energy. This edition includes an expanded discussion of beats that now contains mathematical relationships, equations for designing large horns, an enlarged presentation of transducer designs, expanded tabulations of the acoustic properties of materials, additional information on nondestructive testing, expanded coverage of high-intensity ultrasound, and additional details regarding the medical applications of ultrasonics.
 

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Contents

UltrasonicsA Broad Field
1
History
2
Ultrasonics in Nature
4
Ultrasonic Transmitters
8
LowIntensity Applications
9
HighIntensity Applications
10
Medical ApplicationsLow and HighIntensity
11
References
12
Leather
349
FibrousBonded Composites
350
Plastics
352
Adhesive Bond Integrity
354
Animal Testing
356
Imaging Process Control and Miscellaneous Low Intensity Applications
359
Process Control
377
Underwater Applications
378

Elastic Wave Propagation and Associated Phenomena
13
Power Delivered to an Oscillating System
15
The Velocity of Sound
16
Impingement of an Ultrasonic Wave on a Boundary Between Two Media
21
Transmission Through Thin Plates
40
Diffraction
42
Standing Waves
47
Doppler Effect
50
Beats
54
Attenuation of an Ultrasonic Wave
55
Relaxation
64
Cavitation
66
References
68
Fundamental Equations Employed in Ultrasonic
71
Design of Ultrasonic Horns for Processing Applications
111
Basic Design of Ultrasonic Transducers
139
Determining Properties of Materials
179
Nondestructive TestingBasic Methods and General Considerations
233
Factors Affecting Resolution and Sensitivity
237
Unconventional Techniques Used for Nondestructive Testing
240
Instrumentation
250
References
269
Use of Ultrasonics in the Nondestructive Testing of Metals
273
Internal Structure of Metals
274
Inspection of Basic Structures and Products
288
Inspection of Hot Metals
322
Determination of Bond Integrity
324
Thickness Measurements
326
Inspection of Solder Joints
330
InService Inspection of Nuclear Reactors
333
References
337
Use of Ultrasonics in the Inspection of Nonmetals
343
Timber
345
Tires
348
Delay Lines
379
Applications in Air
380
Measuring Fluid Flow Pressure and Temperature
383
Indicating the Net Load of a Vehicle
387
References
388
Applications of HighIntensity UltrasonicsBasic Mechanisms and Effects
391
General Discussion
392
Mechanical Effects
394
Chemical Effects
402
Metallurgical Effects
413
References
415
Applications of HighIntensity Ultrasonics Based on Mechanical Effects
419
Cleaning
420
Machining Forming and Joining
438
Liquid Atomization and Droplet Formation
467
Agglomeration and Flocculation
474
Agricultural Applications
479
Pest Control
480
Control of Foams
481
Preparation of Carbon Spheres
482
References
487
Applications of Ultrasonics Based on Chemical Effects
493
Treating Beverages Juices and Essential Oils
495
Treatment of Sewage
496
Extraction Processes
497
Demulsification of Crude Petroleum
499
Ultrasonic Catalysis and Chemical Synthesis General Comments
501
Electrolysis and Electroplating
505
References
506
Medical Applications of Ultrasonic Energy
511
Glossary
559
Subject Index
569
Copyright

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Page 572 - a medium in such a manner that at any point in the medium the displacement at a point is a function of the position of the point.
Page 572 - a progressive wave in space, a continuous surface which is a locus of points having the same phase at a given instant; (2)
Page 572 - a progressive surface wave, a continuous line which is a locus of points having the same phase at a given instant.
Page 572 - the presence of objects, determining their direction and range, recognizing their character, and employing the data thus obtained in the performance of
Page 572 - the ratio of the intensity of the transmitted wave to that of the incident wave

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