Ulysses Among the Phaeacians: From the Translation of Homer's Odyssey

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Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1889 - Epic poetry, Greek - 72 pages
 

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Page 33 - A hedge enclosed it round, and lofty trees Flourished in generous growth within, — the pear And the pomegranate, and the apple-tree With its fair fruitage, and the luscious fig And olive always green. The fruit they bear Falls not, nor ever fails in winter time Nor summer, but is yielded all the year.
Page 19 - Must overflow with gladness for thy sake, Beholding such a scion of their house Enter the choral dance. But happiest he Beyond them all, who, bringing princely gifts, Shall bear thee to his home a bride; for sure I never looked on one of mortal race...
Page 31 - In thy tall palace on thy native soil." The blue-eyed Pallas, having spoken thus, Departed o'er the barren deep. She left The pleasant isle of Scheria, and repaired To Marathon and to the spacious streets 95 Of Athens, entering there the massive halls Where dwelt Erectheus, while Ulysses toward The gorgeous palace of Alcinoiis turned His steps, yet stopped and pondered ere he crossed The threshold. For on every side beneath The lofty roof of that magnanimous king 101 A glory shone as of the sun or...
Page 13 - As one who, dwelling in the distant fields, Without a neighbor near him, hides a brand In the dark ashes, keeping carefully The seeds of fire alive, lest he, perforce, To light his hearth must bring them from afar...
Page 22 - Very dear are they To the great gods. We dwell apart, afar Within the unmeasured deep, amid its waves The most remote of men; no other race Hath commerce with us. This man comes to us A wanderer and unhappy, and to him Our cares are due. The stranger and the poor Are sent by Jove, and slight regards to them Are grateful. Maidens, give the stranger food And drink, and take him to the river-side To bathe where there is shelter from the wind.
Page 20 - Farther and farther from Ogygia's isle Had borne me. Now upon this shore some god Casts me, perchance to meet new sufferings here; For yet the end is not, and many things The gods must first accomplish. But do thou, 0 queen, have pity on me, since to thee 1 come the first of all. I do not know A single dweller of the land beside. Show me, I pray, thy city...
Page 2 - ... HARVARD UNIVERSITY LIBRARY OF THE Department of Education COLLECTION OF TEXT-BOOKS...
Page 50 - Of sailors — a mere trader looking out For freight, and watching o'er the wares that form The cargo. Thou hast doubtless gathered wealth By rapine, and art surely no athlete.
Page 22 - Been unrefreshed by oil. I will not bathe Before you. I should be ashamed to stand Unclothed in presence of these brighthaired maids." He spake; they hearkened and withdrew, and told The damsel what he said. Ulysses then Washed the salt spray of ocean from his back And his broad shoulders in the flowing stream, And wiped away the sea-froth from his brows. And when the bath was over, and his limbs Had been anointed, and he had put on The garments sent him by the spotless maid, Jove's daughter, Pallas,...

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