Uncertain Justice: Canadian Women and Capital Punishment, 1754-1953

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Dundurn, Oct 1, 2000 - Biography & Autobiography - 280 pages
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In 1754 Eleanor Powers was hung for a murder committed during a botched robbery. She was the first woman condemned to die in Canada, but would not be the last.

In Uncertain Justice, Beverley Boissery and Murray Greenwood portray a cast of women characters almost as often wronged by the law as they have wronged society. Starting with the Powers trial and continuing to the not-too-distant past, the authors expose the patriarchal values that lie at the core of criminal law, and the class and gender biases that permeate its procedures and applications.

The writing style is similar to that of a popular mystery: "Harriet Henry lay dead. Horribly and indubitably. Her body sprawled against the bed, the head twisted at a grotesque angle. Foam engulfed the grinning mouth." Scholarly analysis combines with the narrative to make Uncertain Justice a fascinating and engaging read.

There is a wealth of information about the emerging and evolving legal system and profession, the state of forensic science, the roles of juries, and the political turmoil and growing resistance to a purely class-based aristocratic form of government.

 

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Contents

Foreword
9
Acknowledgments
11
Introduction
13
Chapter One The Eleanor Power Story
23
Chapter Two The Many Trials of MarieJosephte Corriveau
39
Margaret Jordan Murderer? Pirate?
61
Chapter Four Julia Murdock From Comparative Innocence to Blackest Guilt?
81
Chapter Five The Capital Conviction of Innocent Persons
99
Chapter Seven Elizabeth Workman Sinner or Saint?
141
Chapter Eight Annie Robinson More to be Pitied Than Censured?
161
Chapter Nine Jennie Hawkes A Woman Wronged
181
Chapter Ten Annie Rubletz and Mary Paulette The Far Side of Despair
197
Conclusion
217
Endnotes
231
Selected Bibliography
269
Index
281

Canadian Women and the Criminal Jury in Capital Cases 18671962
123

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About the author (2000)

Dr. F. Murray Greenwood, a Rhodes Scholar and Professor Emeritus (UBC), is the author of numerous scholarly articles and the acclaimed monograph Legacies of Fear. He is the coeditor of the Canadian State Trials Project and is married to Dr. Beverley Boissery, author of A Deep Sense of Wrong (Dundurn Press, 1995). They currently enjoy life at Crescent Beach, B.C.

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