Uncle Sam of Freedom Ridge

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Page 19 - We thought he was goin' to faint, he turned so white an' shaky, an' we got him quick into that chair where you 're sittin'. But he did n't; he just sat there lookin' like the world had dropped from under him, an' sayin' right soft to himself, "Sam's dead — my boy's dead." Andy gave him the telegram, an' he spread it out on his knee, an' looked an
Page 34 - Sam in some tableaux they was gettin' up for a church benefit. He said first he would n't, an' then all at once he said, "All right, I'll be there." A crowd of us was over at the hall havin' a dress rehearsal when in walked the old man. He was dressed as Uncle Sam, all right, but he held his hands like they was tied behind his back, an' a dirty old rope was twisted round his neck an' arms; his head was bowed on his breast, an* he would n't look anybody in the eye.
Page 12 - Well, then the Big War came, an' the day after America went in, young Sam volunteered. Anybody would 've known he would, raised like he'd been. Andy Mason an' me tried to get in, too, but they turned us both down — him on account of his eyes, an' me for flatfoot, doggone it! 'There was a big crowd of us up at the station when young Sam left for camp. An' you never saw anybody look so lifted up an
Page 20 - Sam's alive." After that he bowed his head down on his hands an' shut his eyes, but I don't know whether he was praying to God or his country. And then, if you '11 believe me, he got to his feet an' threw back his shoulders straight an' proud like, an' says, "Well, boys, I promised to help 'em with the Liberty Loan this afternoon, an' it's time I was over at the courthouse now." And with that he put his Uncle Sam's hat on, an...
Page 18 - ... concerned for us, an' callin' us Buddy, like he always did when we were kids an* had got hurt. ' Well,' said the postmaster, speaking with difficulty, 'well, that just made it so I could n't have spoken a word to save my life; but Andy — he's got more to him 'n I have — he put his arm round the old man, an' managed to get out what had happened. ' We thought he was goin' to faint, he turned so white an' shaky, an' we got him quick into that chair where you 're sittin'.
Page 19 - But he did n't; he just sat there lookin' like the world had dropped from under him, an' sayin' right soft to himself, "Sam's dead — my boy's dead." Andy gave him the telegram, an' he spread it out on his knee, an' looked an' looked at it. I don't believe he read it, but he kept spreadin* it out an' spreadin' it out with his shakin' old hands, an' looking at it. We could n't keep the tears back seein' him so lost like, an' anyhow, young Sam was just like a brother to us both.
Page 46 - ... with that kind of holy look he used to have. I could n't think what he had to look like that for now, but it made me feel good to see him. It made you feel as though out of all his confusion an' misery he'd come into harbor at last. It took some of the bitterness out of of me, too, an' I said to myself, "Well, it can't be such a rotten country if the old men can look like that." 'An' just then, the wind blew his long coat open, an' I saw he had on his Uncle Sam clothes.
Page 41 - The old man was here, too, not sayin* anythin' to anybody, just sittin' there with that burnin' miserable look in his eyes. He was all muffled up in an old coat that had belonged to young Sam an' was so big for him, it covered him down to the heels. An' for some reason he would n't take it off, though I tried to get him to. ' Well, while we were waitin', we all got to laughin' about a letter from some crazy feller — at least we said he must be crazy — that had come out in the papers a week or...
Page 8 - ... him, whether he'd had a kind of a vision or what, but he had a notion, sleepin' like that against his father's breast, that what was in that dead man's heart, what he'd volunteered for, an' died for, had been sort of passed on to him. When he woke up, he was n't just a little scared boy any more, he was a member of somethin' bigger, and that somethin' was his country. And it was all sort of mixed up with his religion. I don't b'lieve the old man ever did know where his country stopped an
Page 36 - Bound hand and foot with a rope of everlastin' talk; desertin' his Allies who looked to him, an* betrayin' everythin' our sons have died for!" 'There he stopped dead, like his own words had hit him slap in the face. " What our sons have died for, " he said over again; an' then like that had pulled the cork right out of his heart, and let all his grief loose, he did somethin' I never looked to see him do — he — he just burst right out cryin

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