Uncle Tom's Cabin, Or, Life Among the Lowly, Volume 1

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J.P. Jewett, 1852 - African Americans
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Contents

I
13
II
27
III
31
IV
38
V
54
VI
66
VII
79
VIII
97
XI
154
XII
172
XIII
195
XIV
207
XV
221
XVI
243
XVII
268
XIX
291

IX
118
X
140

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Page viii - For he shall deliver the needy when he crieth; the poor also, and him that hath no helper.
Page 38 - THE cabin of Uncle Tom was a small log building close adjoining to "the house," as the negro par excellence designates his master's dwelling. In front it had a neat garden-patch, where, every summer, strawberries, raspberries, and a variety of fruits and vegetables flourished under careful tending. The whole front of it was covered by a large scarlet bignonia...
Page vii - The object of these sketches is to awaken sympathy and feeling for the African race, as they exist among us ; to show their wrongs and sorrows, under a system so necessarily cruel and unjust as to defeat and do away the good effects of all that can be attempted for them, by their best friends, under it.
Page 81 - Ohio River, were the first hurried outlines of her plan of escape; beyond that she could only hope in God. When horses and vehicles began to move along the highway, with that alert perception peculiar to a state of excitement, and which seems to be a sort of inspiration, she became aware that her headlong pace and distracted air might bring on her remark and suspicion. She therefore put the boy on the ground, and, adjusting her dress and bonnet, she walked on at as rapid a pace as she thought consistent...
Page 84 - Well, take him into this room," said the woman, opening into a small bedroom, where stood a comfortable bed. Eliza laid the weary boy upon it, and held his hand in hers till he was fast asleep. For her there was no rest. As a fire in her bones, the thought of the pursuer urged her on ; and she gazed with longing eyes on the sullen, surging waters that lay between her and liberty.
Page 80 - ... your Harry, mother, or your Willie, that were going to be torn from you by a brutal trader, to-morrow morning,— if you had seen the man, and heard that the papers were signed and delivered, and you had only from twelve o'clock till morning to make...
Page 15 - twas as good as a meetin', now, really, to hear that critter pray; and he was quite gentle and quiet like. He fetched me a good sum, too, for I bought him cheap of a man that was 'bliged to sell out; so I realized six hundred on him. Yes, I consider religion a valeyable thing in a nigger, when it's the genuine article, and no mistake.
Page 134 - under it. The magic of the real presence of distress, — the imploring human eye, the frail, trembling human hand, the despairing appeal of helpless agony, — these he had never tried.
Page 94 - ... raft of ice beyond. It was a desperate leap — impossible to anything but madness and despair; and Haley, Sam, and Andy, instinctively cried out, and lifted up their hands, as she did it.
Page 95 - And, oh, surely, sir, you won't tell any one!" "Go to thunder, gal! What do you take a feller for? In course not," said the man. "Come, now, go along like a likely, sensible gal, as you are. You've arnt your liberty, and you shall have it, for all me.

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