Uncle's Dream and Other Stories

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Penguin Books, 1989 - Fiction - 300 pages
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'Uncle's dream' was the first story that Dostoyevsky completed after his five years of agony in exile in Siberia, and it reveals a profound transformation in his vision of the world. Gone is the contained, brooding, dream-prone atmosphere of his earlier stories; instead 'Uncle's Dream' is narrated with firm objectivity, combining satire, social reportage, puppet theatre and farce in its comic send-up of small-town manners and morals. Dostoyevsky's inspiration for The Meek Girl came from a newspaper report on the suicide of a seamstress who plunged from a garret window, holding a religious icon in her hands. According to the critic John Jones, it is 'one of the most powerful studies of despair in world literature, a banging on closed doors imagined with absolute fearlessness'. This volume also contains A Weak Heart and White Nights and an illuminating introductory essay on Dostoyevsky's short stories by the translator, David McDuff.

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Contents

Introduction
9
A Weak Heart
27
White Nights
71
Copyright

3 other sections not shown

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About the author (1989)

Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821–1881), one of nineteenth-century Russia’s greatest novelists, spent four years in a convict prison in Siberia, after which he was obliged to enlist in the army. In later years his penchant for gambling sent him deeply into debt. Most of his important works were written after 1864, including Notes from Underground, Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, and The Brothers Karamazov, all available from Penguin Classics.


David McDuff was educated at the University of Edinburgh and has translated a number of works for Penguin Classics, including Dostoyevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov.


David McDuff was educated at the University of Edinburgh and has translated a number of works for Penguin Classics, including Dostoyevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov.

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