Undergrounders

Front Cover
Scholastic Canada, Jan 1, 2013 - Juvenile Fiction - 208 pages
4 Reviews
Can playing hockey help a street kid get his life back?

After his mom dies, and the landlord kicks him out, 12-year-old Jonathan faces the loneliness and danger of life on the streets - until he meets Lewis. Lewis takes him under his wing and leads him to his new home among a group of kids living in an abandoned underground shopping mall who call themselves the "Undergrounders." Now renamed "Mouse," Jonathan runs errands, delivers packages and panhandles for food money.

An escape from this life underground comes to him in the form of hockey gear. Stolen hockey gear, but hockey gear nonetheless. He suits up and heads to the community rink, where he befriends regular kids who welcome him into their game and onto their team. He agrees, knowing he can never tell them about being homeless.

Playing hockey makes him feel like a kid again, but keeping his double life a secret proves to be more difficult and dangerous than he ever could have imagined.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ydenomy - LibraryThing

I really enjoyed this novel by David Skuy. The characters were well developed, along with an engaging plot, especially for hockey fans. I expect this one will be a hit with our YA readers. Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Amazing!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
8
Section 3
13
Section 4
23
Section 5
29
Section 6
35
Section 7
41
Section 8
46
Section 18
110
Section 19
115
Section 20
119
Section 21
126
Section 22
131
Section 23
138
Section 24
146
Section 25
151

Section 9
53
Section 10
59
Section 11
66
Section 12
70
Section 13
77
Section 14
85
Section 15
92
Section 16
98
Section 17
104
Section 26
157
Section 27
164
Section 28
169
Section 29
175
Section 30
180
Section 31
189
Section 32
195
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

David Skuy is a lawyer, a writer and a Leafs fan to the core. He spent most of his childhood playing some sport or another. What he remembers most is the intensity, the competitiveness, and the sheer enjoyment of playing a sport you love whne you're young. David lives in Toronto, Ontario.

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