Understanding Ethnic Media: Producers, Consumers, and Societies

Front Cover
SAGE Publications, May 27, 2010 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 314 pages
0 Reviews

This is the first book to provide a comprehensive review and analysis of how media produced by ethnic communities, and for ethnic communities, affect identity and perceived lines of division between us and others, as well as how the production and consumption of ethnic media affect the character of the larger media and societal landscapes.

Integrating key ethnic media studies with original research, this book makes a unique contribution to the teaching literature by covering both consumers and producers of ethnic media, as well as the history of ethnic media, its role in ethnic communities, the effect of globalization, and the professional challenges faced by ethnic media journalists. A compelling discussion of the future of ethnic media concludes the book and points the way toward further research.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

About the author (2010)

Matthew D. Matsaganis (Ph.D., University of Southern California) is an Assistant Professor of Communication at the University at Albany, State University of New York. His research addresses issues of ethnic media production and sustainability, neighborhood effects and the role of communication in building civic engagement and community capacity, as well as health disparities and the social determinants of health. His research has been published in the American Behavioral Scientist, Human Communication Research, the Electronic Journal of Communication, and the Encyclopedia of International Media and Communications; he has presented his work at a number of academic and professional conferences. Matthew is also a recovering print journalist. He has worked for a variety of publications in Athens, Greece and New York City. In November 2001, he received a certificate of recognition from the U.S. Congress for his work as a journalist and for promoting Greek-American friendship and cooperation.

Vikki S. Katz (Ph.D., University of Southern California) is an Assistant Professor of Communication in the School of Communication and Information at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Her research explores issues of ethnic media consumption, particularly the interplay between media content and access to community resources in ethnic minority and immigrant neighborhoods. She has conducted research on the relationship between family decision-making around media content and disparities in connecting to health care, schools, and social services; children’s translating activities around media content; the viability of ethnic media with second and third generation audiences; and the role of family communication in civic engagement. Her research has been published in the Journal of Communication and the Journal of Children and Media. She has also presented her work at academic and professional conferences on topics including ethnic media viability, intergenerational media connection patterns, and immigrant family media use.

Sandra J. Ball-Rokeach (Ph.D., University of Washington) is a Professor of Communication and Sociology in the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, at the University of Southern California. She is also the Principal Investigator of the Metamorphosis Project. Sandra is author or editor of six books: Violence and the Media (with R. K. Baker), Theories of Mass Communication (with M. L. DeFleur), The Great American Values Test: Influencing Belief and Behavior through Television (with M. Rokeach & J. W. Grube), Media, Audience and Society (with M. G. Cantor), Paradoxes of Youth and Sport (with M. Gatz and M. Messner), and Technological Visions: The Hopes and Fears that Shape New Technologies (with M. Sturken and D. Thomas). Her published articles appear in such journals as Communication Research, Journalism Quarterly, Mass Communication and Society, American Sociological Review, Public Opinion Quarterly, Journal of Communication, New Media and Society, Social Problems, and The American Psychologist. She has been co-editor (with C. R. Berger) of Communication Research from 1992 to 1997, a Fulbright scholar at the Hebrew University and a Rockefeller Fellow at the Bellagio Study Center. She currently is a fellow of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues and the International Communication Association. She also serves on the advisory boards of the McCune Foundations, Southern California Public Radio, and the Research and Learning Group, BBC World Service Trust. Her service on editorial boards includes the Journal Communication, Communication Studies, the International Journal of Communication, the American Journal of Media Psychology, and the Chinese Journal of Communication.

Bibliographic information