Understanding Plague: The Medical and Imaginative Texts of Medieval Spain

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Peter Lang, 2008 - History - 119 pages
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The outbreak of the plague in 1347, commonly referred to as the Black Death, was the source of numerous socio-economic changes in the later Middle Ages. Numerous studies have traced the progress and effects of the disease in countries such as Germany, England, France, and Spain. Such a study concerning Spain has been conspicuously absent until now. The present investigation is among the first to bring together information that documents the pernicious behavior of the disease in Spain and to demonstrate how it changed the societies it afflicted. Studying the medical and imaginative texts of medieval Spain, reveals that the disease did, in fact, help change the perceived role of the medical practitioner, the idea of public health, and the portrayal of death and dying.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER
13
CHAPTER
29
CHAPTER THREE
57
Conclusion
101
Bibliography
115
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

The Author: Randal P. Garza earned his Ph.D. from Michigan State University and is currently Professor of Spanish at the University of Tennessee at Martin. He has served as Editorial Assistant of Celestinesca, a journal dedicated to the study of the Medieval work Celestina by Fernando de Rojas, and has recently published on Latin American film. In addition, he has written articles and papers on plague studies in Spain, Portugal, and Brazil.

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