Understanding School Refusal: A Handbook for Professionals in Education, Health and Social Care

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Jessica Kingsley Publishers, Dec 15, 2007 - Psychology - 160 pages
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` Combining educational and clinical perspectives, and with extensive use of case studies, the authors present recent research into the mental health problems associated with school refusal, such as anxiety and panic attacks, as well as the role that parental support plays in their children's school life. They also discuss the role of home tuition services and pupil referral units in extreme cases of school refusal, and provides concrete strategies for planning and organising services to manage the problem effectively. Understanding School Refusal is a valuable guide for professionals across the disciplines of education, health and social care, and will also be useful for training courses within these fields.' Education Today School refusal is a crippling condition in which children experience extreme anxiety or panic attacks when faced with everyday school life and this handbook aims to explore and raise awareness of the problem of school refusal in children and young people, and provide plans and strategies for education, health and social care professionals for identifying and addressing this problem. Combining educational and clinical perspectives, and with extensive use of case studies, the authors present recent research into the mental health problems associated with school refusal, such as anxiety and panic attacks, as well as the role that parental support plays in their children's school life. They also discuss the role of home tuition services and pupil referral units in extreme cases of school refusal, and provides concrete strategies for planning and organising services to manage the problem effectively. Understanding School Refusal is a valuable guide for professionals across the disciplines of education, health and social care, and will also be useful for training courses within these fields.
 

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Contents

School Nonattendance
11
2 Identifying and Understanding School Refusal
25
3 The Nature of Anxiety
40
4 Assessment
57
5 Principles of Intervention and Management
72
6 Working with Parents and Children
84
7 Supporting Children and Young People at School
95
8 Role of Home Tuition and Pupil Referral Units
109
9 Strategic Planning
121
Research Findings
129
Appendix II Specimen Assessment Form
141
Appendix III Handout for Parents
144
References
151
Subject Index
155
Author Index
160
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Page 26 - ... and pressure from teachers, family doctors and educational welfare officers. The behaviour may be accompanied by overt signs of anxiety or even panic when the time comes to go to school, and most children cannot even leave home to set out for school. Many who do, return home halfway there, and some children once at school rush home in a state of anxiety. Many children insist that they want to go to school and prepare to do so but cannot manage it when the time comes, (pp.
Page 26 - Children were diagnosed as suffering from "school phobia" when they showed the following features : (1) Severe difficulty in attending school — often amounting to prolonged absence. (2) Severe emotional upset — shown by such symptoms as excessive fearfulness, undue tempers, misery, or complaints of feeling ill without obvious organic cause on being faced with the prospect of going to school. (3) Staying at home with the knowledge of the parents, when they should be at school, at some stage in...
Page 2 - Listening to Young People in School, Youth Work and Counselling Nick Luxmoore ISBN 1 85302 909 2...
Page 151 - R. (1993). DSM-III-R disorders, social factors and management of school attendance problems in the normal population.
Page 25 - The child is absent from school for periods varying from several months to a year. The absence is consistent. At all times the parents know where the child is. It is with the mother or near the home. The reason for the truancy is incomprehensible to the parents and the school. The child may say that it is afraid to go to school, afraid of the teacher, or say that it does not know why it will not go to school.
Page 151 - Atkinson, L., Quarrington, B., & Cyr, JJ (1985). School refusal: The heterogeneity of a concept.
Page 151 - Audit Commission (1999). Missing out: LEA management of school attendance and exclusion. London: Audit Commission.

About the author (2007)

Dr M. S. Thambirajah, MB BS, FRCPsych, is Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist at Walsall Teaching Primary Care Trust, UK. He has published two books on psychiatry and child mental health. Karen J. Grandison, BSc, PGCE, PG Dip, MSC, is a Senior Educational Psychologist in Walsall, and Academic and Professional Tutor at the University of Birmingham, UK. Louise De-Hayes, BA (Hons), PGCE, is Manager of the Shepwell Centre Pupil Referral Unit, Walsall.

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