Understanding the Financial Score

Front Cover
Morgan & Claypool Publishers, 2007 - Business & Economics - 159 pages
0 Reviews
Financial statements and information drawn from them confront us daily: in the media, in corporate annual reports, in the treasurer‚€™s reports for clubs or religious groups, in documents provided to employees and managers, as one considers alternative investments, in documents provided by homeowners‚€™ association and government agenciesVarious readers of a company‚€™s ‚€œfinancial score‚€ make decisions based on financial information: the company‚€™s managers devise actions to improve operations; investors buy or sell the corporation‚€™s securities; creditors decide how much to lend; customers judge the reliability of this supplier; potential employees decide whether to invest their careers in the company.If you are training to be an accountant, find another book. This book‚€™s objective is to increase your ability to draw useful information from financial statements, and thus to make better decisions‚€”in both your personal life and your professional life. Studying this book should help you be a better manager. That is both its objective and its perspective.The book starts at square one; it assumes no prior knowledge on your part. To increase your financial literacy, you will learn the common nomenclature (but not esoteric jargon) used by accountants and financial experts. You will be equipped to ask insightful questions of experts, to engage them and your colleagues in thoughtful debates about financial and accounting issues, and to make better decisions.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

II
1
IV
2
V
3
VII
5
VIII
6
IX
8
X
9
XI
10
LXXX
72
LXXXII
74
LXXXIV
75
LXXXV
76
LXXXVI
77
LXXXIX
78
XC
79
XCII
80

XIII
11
XIV
12
XV
14
XVI
16
XVII
17
XIX
18
XX
20
XXII
21
XXIII
23
XXIV
24
XXV
25
XXVI
26
XXVII
27
XXVIII
28
XXX
29
XXXI
30
XXXII
32
XXXIII
34
XXXIV
35
XXXV
36
XXXVI
37
XXXVIII
39
XXXIX
41
XL
42
XLI
43
XLII
45
XLIII
46
XLV
47
XLVI
48
XLVII
49
XLIX
50
LII
51
LIV
53
LVI
54
LVII
55
LVIII
56
LX
57
LXI
58
LXII
59
LXIII
60
LXV
61
LXVII
62
LXIX
63
LXX
64
LXXIII
65
LXXIV
66
LXXVI
67
LXXVII
68
LXXIX
71
XCV
81
XCVIII
82
XCIX
83
C
84
CI
85
CII
87
CIII
88
CIV
89
CV
90
CVI
91
CVII
93
CVIII
100
CIX
101
CXI
102
CXII
103
CXIII
104
CXIV
105
CXV
106
CXVI
107
CXVII
108
CXIX
109
CXX
110
CXXI
112
CXXII
113
CXXIII
115
CXXV
117
CXXVI
118
CXXVII
124
CXXVIII
126
CXXIX
127
CXXXI
128
CXXXII
130
CXXXIII
132
CXXXIV
133
CXXXV
134
CXXXVI
135
CXXXIX
136
CXLI
137
CXLIII
138
CXLIV
139
CXLV
140
CXLVI
141
CXLVIII
146
CXLIX
149
CLI
150
CLII
151
CLIII
153
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 3 - ASSETS Current Assets Cash Accounts receivable Inventory Prepaid expenses Other current assets Total current assets Fixed Assets (Net) Factory equipment Office equipment Land & buildings Total fixed assets Intangible Assets Goodwill Total Assets LIABILITIES & OWNERS...
Page 3 - Shareholders' equity Invested capital Retained earnings Total shareholders' equity Total liabilities and shareholders...

About the author (2007)

Henry E. Riggs is the Founding President Emeritus of Keck Graduate Institute of Applied Life Science, founded in 1997 in Claremont, CA.