Understanding Modernisation In Criminal Justice

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McGraw-Hill Education (UK), Dec 1, 2007 - Social Science - 268 pages
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This is the first book to theorize modernization in the context of criminal justice. It provides a historically informed account tracing the evolving links between new public management and modernization as well as proposing a conceptual framework for understanding the impact of policies on each criminal justice agency in England and Wales.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Part One
13
Part Two
79
Part Three
203
References
231
Websites
247
Index
248
Backcover
269
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About the author (2007)

Professor Paul Senior is Director of the Hallam Centre for Community Justice at Sheffield Hallam University and Visiting Professor at the University of Wales, NEWI. Paul has been involved in professional education, consultancy and research for twenty-two years. His professional background is in the Probation Service where he worked in the youth offending field, in partnerships with the voluntary sector and in resettlement. Between 1995 and 2001 he also worked as an organizational development consultant working on many projects with the Home Office, Community Justice National Training Organization, CCETSW and other national organizations. Professor Senior is in a unique position of being both policy developer and involved in the implementation of policy. He has published widely on resettlement, probation practice and criminal justice policy making.

Dr Chris Crowther-Dowey teaches Criminology at Nottingham Trent University and has considerable experience of teaching criminology and criminal justice at all levels of study. His published work examines policing and community safety.

Dr. Matt Long is Senior Lecturer in Criminology at Nottingham Trent University. For 6 years he trained senior police officers within National Police Training at Bramshill, including a spell acting as head of the Accelerated Promotion Course. In 2002, he was appointed Professor of Law and Police Science at the world renowned John Jay College of Criminal Justice, within the City University of New York. He recently completed research on behalf of the Hallam Centre for Community Justice with regard to the civil renewal agenda and introduction of PCSOs in the context of policing. He still regularly acts as a consultant to Centrex and higher police training.

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