Understanding the Psychology of Diversity

Front Cover
SAGE, Apr 13, 2007 - Psychology - 256 pages
Understanding the Psychology of Diversity is a wide-ranging textbook that covers the cognitive and emotional underpinnings of prejudice attached to all forms of inequality, and will be a very useful textbook for an array of students. The book features chapters on traditional prejudice topics such as categorization and stereotypes, sexism, racism, and social stigma. Mixed in with this content are further chapters that explore newer and more nontraditional diversity topics, such as sexual-orientation and social class-based prejudice, weight and appearance-based prejudice, and diversity on television.
 

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Contents

Cognitive
20
Stereotyping
27
Consequences of social categorization and stereotyping
35
Social Processes that Shape
41
Stereotypic communication
51
Summary
57
Using prejudice
65
Using prejudice
71
Explaining gender differences
109
Summary
116
Understanding Obesity Stereotypes and Weightism
122
Classism
138
Diversity on Television
156
The Experience of Prejudice
170
Coping with Social Stigma
183
Behavioral
207

Hate crime
77
Racism
90
Summary
95
Understanding Gender Stereotypes and Sexism
101
References
223
Index
251
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About the author (2007)

Bruce E. Blaine (PhD, SUNY at Buffalo) is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Statistics Program at St. John Fisher College in Rochester, NY. He is widely published in social and health psychology. His other research interests include obesity treatment effectiveness and meta-analytic research methods.

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