Unearthly Disclosure

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Random House, Feb 28, 2011 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 384 pages
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Unearthly Disclosure is a story of alien bases, alien contacts and abductions, genetic mutants, animal mutilations, and government paranoia. Here, Timothy Good, one of the world's most respected authorities on the alien phenomenon, reveals for the first time sensational information provided to him by high-level military and scientific sources, who confirm that aliens have established subterranean and submarine bases on Earth and that extra-terrestrial contact has been made with a select group in the US military and scientific intelligence community.

Among numerous revelations in this book are those involving the alien creature photographed by Filiberto Caponi in Italy. The author spent several years investigating this controversial case and commissioned an Expert Witness checked by the Law Society to analyse Caponi's astonishing photographs. Published for the first time, this unique story forms the central section of Unearthly Disclosure.

 

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Contents

A Source of Unknown Energy
11
Displacements
31
Soul Vampires
48
Operation Andromeda
68
New Dimensions
84
Wortex
105
An Atrophied Culture
126
The Creature of Pretare
140
Charges Confessions and Denials
193
Analysis and Hypotheses
207
The Creatures of Warginha
224
A Predatory Threat
243
Creatures Galore
266
Island of Enchantment
280
Resident Aliens
306
Appendix
326

Dead or Alive
156
Full Exposure
182

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About the author (2011)

Now regarded as the world's top authority on the alien presence, Tim Good has researched UFOs since 1961, interviewing key witnesses and amassing an unmatched wealth of evidence, enabling him to argue the case for alien life on planet earth. He has written a number of scientific books about extra-terrestrial activity, and is a leading lecturer on UFOs and aliens. He is also a professional violinist, and was a member of the London symphony orchestra for fourteen years.

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