Unfinished Business: Racial Equality in American History

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Oxford University Press, Oct 1, 2007 - Law - 272 pages
Michael J. Klarman, author of From Jim Crow to Civil Rights, which won the prestigious Bancroft Prize in American History, is one of the leading authorities on the history of civil rights law in the United States. In Unfinished Business, he illuminates the course of racial equality in America, revealing that we have made less progress than we like to think. Indeed, African Americans have had to fight for everything they have achieved. Klarman highlights a variety of social and political factors that have influenced the path of racial progress--wars, migrations, urbanization, shifting political coalitions--and he looks in particular at the contributions of law and of court decisions to American equality. The author argues that court decisions tend to reflect the racial mores of the times, which is why the Supreme Court has not been a heroic defender of the rights of racial minorities. And even when the Court has promoted progressive racial change, its decisions have often been unenforced, in part because severely oppressed groups rarely have the resources necessary to force the issue. Klarman also sheds light on the North/South dynamic and how it has influenced racial progress, arguing that as southerners have become more anxious about outside challenges to their system of white supremacy, they have acted in ways that eventually undermined that system. For example, as southern slave owners demanded greater guarantees for slavery from the federal government, they alienated northerners, who came to fear a slave power conspiracy that would interfere with their liberties. Unfinished Business offers an invaluable, succinct account of racial equality and civil rights throughout American history.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Founding
9
The Antebellum Period
25
The Civil War and Reconstruction
45
Retreat from Reconstruction
61
White Supremacy Ascendant
75
The Progressive Era
93
Between the World Wars
111
World War II
129
Brown v Board of Education
147
The Civil Rights Era
165
To the Present
183
Conclusion
205
Select Bibliography
223
Index
231
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Michael J. Klarman is James Monroe Distinguished Professor of Law and Professor of History, University of Virginia. One of the nations leading authorities on race and constitutional history, he clerked for Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and he won the 2005 Bancroft Prize for From Jim Crow to Civil Rights: The Supreme Court and the Struggle for Racial Equality. He has written for The Nation among other publications and has given talks across the country.

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