Unglued Empire: The Soviet Experience with Communications Technologies

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1996 - Business & Economics - 234 pages
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. . .Ganley has marshaled an extrodinary range and volume of information and presents the story with bolth clarity and drama. Unglued Empire offers a gold mine of case-study data for scholars analyzing the interplay of politics and modern communication technology. . . - DEGREESITechnology and Culture There is no doubt that the growing availability of television and its technology, which made it possible to report scenes instantly, did have an impact on the collapse of the Soviet Union. Mikhail Gorbachev decided that his country needed a dose of openness or Glasnost to modernize society and make the people more supportive of his efforts. In the end, more information about the outside world as well as the inside world helped to bring down the communist party and the Soviet government. This book documents this process, showing how the media's ready availability became such a divisive force in the Soviet Union. Instead of creating a more structured, rigid regime, it did just the opposite. The Soviet Union may well have collapsed of its own weight sooner or later, but there is no doubt that the media, technology and communications accelerated the process, a form of uskoreniie that Gorbachev never intended. Many of the events described in this study have application to other researchers and government officials. The study makes it possible to understand some of the new challenges that regimes wary of criticism will have to face in the future.

 

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Contents

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About the author (1996)

nley /f Gladys /i D.