Unjust by Design: Canada's Administrative Justice System

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UBC Press, 2013 - Law - 362 pages
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Canadian legislatures regularly assign what are truly court functions to non-court, government tribunals. These executive branch "judicial" tribunals are surrogate courts and together comprise a little-known system of administrative justice that annually makes hundreds of thousands of contentious, life-altering judicial decisions concerning the everyday rights of both individuals and businesses. This book demonstrates that, except perhaps in Quebec, the administrative justice system is a justice system in name only. Failing to conform to rule-of-law principles or constitutional norms, its tribunals are neither independent nor impartial and are only providentially competent. Unjust by Design describes a justice system in transcendent need of major restructuring and provides a blueprint for change.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Defeating the Rule of Law in the Administrative Justice System
36
2 Administrative Justice
134
3 Administrative Judicial Tribunals
187
4 Prelude to Reform
204
5 The Reform Proposal
231
6 Implementing the Reform Proposal
283
7 Meanwhile a Toolkit for Litigators
286
Notes
291
Select Bibliography
332
Index
344
About the Author
363
Other books in the Law and Society Series
364
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Ron Ellis is an administrative lawlawyer, teacher, academic, arbitrator, and former chair and CEO of amajor administrative judicial tribunal. He has been teaching, speaking, and writing about administrative justice system issues for more thanthirty years.

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