Unreasonable Searches and Seizures: Rights and Liberties Under the Law

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ABC-CLIO, 2006 - Law - 445 pages
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"Unreasonable Searches and Seizures: Rights and Liberties under the Law" provides a comprehensive exploration of the development of the Fourth Amendment from the late 18th century to the present. The work clearly explains complex legal questions and pivotal judicial decisions, illustrating the controversial nature of Fourth Amendment issues and differentiating between reasonable and unreasonable searches and seizures.

Presenting a wealth of cases and examples, the authors analyze important developments, such as the impact of the Supreme Court's decision in "Weeks v. United States" (prohibiting federal courts from admitting evidence obtained in violation of the Amendment), the expansion of Fourth Amendment protections in the 1960s, the apparent weakening of rights since the early 1970s, and the contraction of the exclusionary rule in response to the war on drugs and the war on terror.

 

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Contents

1 Introduction
1
2 Origins
19
3 TwentiethCentury Issues
65
4 The Twentyfirst Century
187
5 Key Cases Concepts Persons Laws and Terms
245
6 Documents
299
Chronology
377
Table of Cases
395
Annotated Bibliography
403
Index
423
About the Authors
445
Copyright

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Page xi - Let me add that a bill of rights is what the people are entitled to against every government on earth, general or particular, and what no just government should refuse, or rest on inference.
Page xviii - The very purpose of a Bill of Rights was to withdraw certain subjects from the vicissitudes of political controversy, to place them beyond the reach of majorities and officials and to establish them as legal principles to be applied by the courts. One's right to life, liberty, and property, to free speech, a free press, freedom of worship and assembly, and other fundamental rights may not be submitted to vote; they depend on the outcome of no elections.

About the author (2006)

Otis H. Stephens, PhD, is Alumni Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science and resident scholar of constitutional law in the College of Law at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN.

Richard A. Glenn, PhD, is professor and chair of government and political affairs at Millersville University, Millersville, PA. His published works include ABC-CLIO's The Right to Privacy.

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