Unsettling Sikh and Muslim Conflict: Mistaken Identities, Forced Conversions, and Postcolonial Formations

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Lexington Books, Apr 4, 2013 - Religion - 148 pages
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This book provides a critical investigation into Sikh and Muslim conflict in the postcolonial setting. Being Sikh in a diasporic context creates challenges that require complex negotiations between other ethnic minorities as well as the national majority. Unsettling Sikh and Muslim Conflict: Mistaken Identities, Forced Conversions, and Postcolonial Formations maps in theoretically informed and empirically rich detail the trope of Sikh-Muslim antagonism as it circulates throughout the diaspora. While focusing on contemporary manifestations of Sikh-Muslim hostility, the book also draws upon historical examples of such conflict to explore the way in which the past has been mobilized to tell a story about the future of Sikhs. This book uses critical race theory to understand the performance of postcolonial subjectivity in the heart of the metropolis.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Deconstructing Sikhs
9
2 The Development of the Sikh Diaspora
21
3 A History of Conflict
31
4 Explaining Conflict
39
5 Sweet Seduction
55
6 Accounting for Sikh and Muslim Conflict
71
7 Sikhs and the British Ethnoscapes
81
8 Sikh Not Muslim
93
9 Who Is a Sikh?
109
Conclusion
117
References
123
Index
129
About the Author
135
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Katy P. Sian is a lecturer in sociology at The University of Manchester. Previously she was a postdoctoral research fellow at The University of Leeds where she also completed her PhD. She takes a key interest in debates surrounding racism and ethnicity studies, sociology, Sikh studies, Islamophobia, postcolonialism, Diaspora and South Asian identity.

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