Unstill Life: Art, politics and living with Clifton Pugh

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Allen & Unwin, 2008 - Biography & Autobiography - 368 pages
Judith and Clifton Pugh met in September 1970. He was an artist with an international reputation; she was twenty years younger than him and had just joined the Australian Labor Party. Their decade together was a heady mix of painting, policy and pleasure where the boundaries between political, social and art worlds were blurred, reflecting the rapidly changing face of Australian society. But there was a darker side to this successful partnership - for the first time, Judith reveals the complexity of a relationship haunted by wartime experiences.

This is a gritty behind-the-scenes look at Australia's most radical government, about the days when the likes of Gough Whitlam, Don Dunstan and Christina Stead came to stay and Bert and Barbara Tucker were among their closest friends. With a unique female perspective on the times, it's about influencing change and balancing power on both grand and intimate levels.
 

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Contents

1 Place
1
2 Family before fame
8
3 Background
15
4 Portraits in a marriage
29
5 Our art world
40
6 Retrospective
52
7 Guests visitors inhabitants
63
8 Violence
72
20 Character
202
21 Abortion
214
22 Going on
225
23 Double dissolution
236
24 Grounded
248
25 Alive
259
26 Home
266
27 United Kingdom
281

9 To be the nude
85
10 Power
95
11 Influence
105
12 Grass roots
114
13 War stories
125
14 Dunstan
137
15 1972
149
16 Loss
159
17 Strategy
169
18 Victory
182
19 Tone
190
28 Travel
291
29 1975
301
30 Consolidation
311
31 Party
325
32 Leda
341
Sources
352
Picture credits
353
Acknowledgements
356
Index
358
Copyright

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Page 242 - Bummer's right-hand man, came in to ask if there was anything he could do to help with the case against his boss.
Page 121 - Picture boards and asking simple questions that can be answered with a nod or shake of the head can help improve the person's ability to express himself.
Page 109 - The prize is judged by the Trustees of the Art Gallery of New South Wales. The subject has to have made a contribution to the arts, letters, or public life.
Page 137 - Always remember, you may not like what the interviewer asks or says, but you are not talking to the interviewer. You are talking to the audience. Use the question to say what you want.
Page 217 - I have had to have two abortions, and I suppose that most of the other abortions are performed under the same sleazy and terrifying conditions.
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Page 81 - CAAB, and under his prime ministership the Australian Film Development Corporation and the National Film and Television Training School were set up.
Page 149 - Smear the cream onto the end of a piece of wood such as a broom handle, and poke it down the burrow.

About the author (2008)

Judith was there, an integral part of the turbulent times. She has spent a lifetime in the arts, collaborating on Degenerates and Perverts (MUP) which won the 2005 NSW Premier's History Award and has contributed essays to many publications over the years, including La Trobe Essays (Black Inc., 2006).

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