US Army Twenty Years/Plus

Front Cover
Trafford Publishing, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 187 pages

This is a story about an enlisted man from Georgia who served more than 20 years in the US Army.

The story begins with his enlistment in August 1951, taking basic training at Camp Gordon, Georgia and retiring with more than 20 years service at Fort Gordon on February 29, 1972. It gives an overview of his advancement in rank from Private to First Sergeant.

Marsingill was not a combat arms soldier but was in the Signal Corps which served as the eyes and ears of the combat forces. He was not a combat hero but did serve two years in combat zones in Korea and Vietnam.

The story tells of his assignments to Korea, Japan, Germany, Argentina, Liberia and Vietnam. Some of his over-sea assignments were typical for the military and some not so typical. Some of his assignments containing interesting duties were in Korea, Argentina, Liberia and Vietnam.

In Argentina he taught maintenance and repair of radio communications equipment to soldiers of the Argentine army. At first they were skeptical about the methods for teaching by the US Army. Before the end of the mission the Argentine soldiers agreed with the teaching methods and expressed their appreciation.

In Liberia Marsingill served one year as Senior Advisor to the Liberian Army officer who commanded the Liberia Signal Unit. The Liberian Army Signal officer, Lt. Gray Allison, was later promoted to Captain by President Tubman. After Samuel Doe took control of the Liberian Government, Allison was promoted to Major General and appointed to the position of Defense Minister.

In 1989 Allison was charged with murder in the killing of a young police officer so the victim's heart and other organs could be used in black magic rituals.

While in Liberia Marsingill established a training program for the Liberian Army to teach basic electronics and repair of electronic equipment. He also installed a radio communications link between the US Military Mission headquarters in Monrovia and a US Military advisor detachment located at a remote site in bush country.

Marsingill witnessed many unusual things while serving in Liberia and tells about them in this book. The author's last overseas tour was in Vietnam. There as a senior NCO, he encountered many unpleasant situations. It seemed that discipline was lax and moral was low. Many young soldiers were involved with marijuana and some with heroin. Many of the soldiers resented being in Vietnam so it was difficult to keep them focused on the mission especially with the news of the anti-Vietnam war protest back home.


 

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Contents

CHAPTER 1
17
CHAPTER 2
21
CHAPTER 3
23
CHAPTER 4
25
CHAPTER 5
40
CHAPTER 6
48
CHAPTER 7
52
CHAPTER 8
59
CHAPTER 10
81
CHAPTER 11
104
CHAPTER 12
116
CHAPTER 13
158
CHAPTER 14
160
CHAPTER 15
185
About the Author
187
Copyright

CHAPTER 9
73

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About the author (2003)

J. Chester Marsingill was born in Buford, Georgia in 1932. After serving more than 20 years in the Army he went back to school. He enrolled in Augusta Technical School in Augusta, Georgia to pursue an education in Electronic Technology. After graduating he took employment with the Federal Government. He initially worked as an Electronic Technician in a communications equipment repair shop at Robins Air Force Base near Warner Robbins, Georgia. After a short stay at the Air Force Base, he transferred to the U.S. Army Signal school at Fort Gordon, Georgia. There he worked as an electronic technician and shop foreman in a communications equipment repair facility. He eventually moved over to the academic portion of the Signal School where he worked as an Electronic Training Specialist. As a training specialist, his duties were to develop training material to be used in training soldiers in the electronic field. At the time of his retirement he was involved with developing training material to be used in teaching soldiers how to operate, maintain and repair satellite communications equipment. He retired in 1989 after more than 36 years total government service.The author is married to Fumiyo Kanaya formerly of Japan and has two sons, Philip and Joseph. He also has three grandchildren, Melissa, Erin and Brendon who were born in Augusta, Georgia. He has six great-grandchildren also born in Augusta.The author was inspired to write this book by one of Brendon's teachers while on a Tutt middle school field trip to the Four-H Club Camp at Tybee Island, near Savannah, Georgia in the Spring of 2001. As he was telling the teacher about his travels while in the Army, she suggested he put the information on paper so there would be a record of his travels.

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