VALIS

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Oct 18, 2011 - Fiction - 240 pages
5 Reviews

“Dick is one of the ten best American writers of the twentieth century, which is saying a lot. Dick was a kind of Kafka steeped in LSD and rage.”—Roberto Bolaño

What is VALIS? This question is at the heart of Philip K. Dick’s ground-breaking novel, and the first book in his defining trilogy. When a beam of pink light begins giving a schizophrenic man named Horselover Fat (who just might also be known as Philip K. Dick) visions of an alternate Earth where the Roman Empire still reigns, he must decide whether he is crazy, or whether a godlike entity is showing him the true nature of the world.

VALIS is essential reading for any true Philip K. Dick fan, a novel that Roberto Bolaño called “more disturbing than any novel by [Carson] McCullers.” By the end, like Dick himself, you will be left wondering what is real, what is fiction, and just what the price is for divine inspiration.

 

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User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This is a tough read. It's the only novel that brings me to tears on multiple occasions, even after repeated reads. It's brutally honest. Don't read it if you're already depressed, it could be the last straw.

Review: VALIS (VALIS Trilogy #1)

User Review  - Ben Newton - Goodreads

I'm a PKD fan but didn't like this one at all. Yes, it has an interesting structure and the fractured POV of the protagonist/narrator is a pretty nifty device. Yes, it is semi-autobiographical and was ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

1
1
2
12
3
27
4
41
5
65
6
85
7
108
8
129
10
173
11
190
12
210
13
233
14
240
Appendix
257
Back Cover
xxvi
Spine
xxvii

9
149

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About the author (2011)

Over a writing career that spanned three decades, PHILIP K. DICK (1928–1982) published 36 science fiction novels and 121 short stories in which he explored the essence of what makes man human and the dangers of centralized power. Toward the end of his life, his work turned toward deeply personal, metaphysical questions concerning the nature of God. Eleven novels and short stories have been adapted to film, notably Blade Runner (based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?), Total Recall,Minority Report, and A Scanner Darkly. The recipient of critical acclaim and numerous awards throughout his career, Dick was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2005, and in 2007 the Library of America published a selection of his novels in three volumes. His work has been translated into more than twenty-five languages.

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