Value-Based Software Engineering

Front Cover
Stefan Biffl, Aybuke Aurum, Barry Boehm, Hakan Erdogmus, Paul Grünbacher
Springer Science & Business Media, Feb 23, 2006 - Computers - 388 pages
Ross Jeffery When, as a result of pressure from the CEO, the Chief Information Officer poses the question “Just what is this information system worth to the organization?” the IT staff members are typically at a loss. “That’s a difficult question,” they might say; or “well it really depends” is another answer. Clearly, neither of these is very satisfactory and yet both are correct. The IT community has struggled with qu- tions concerning the value of an organization’s investment in software and ha- ware ever since it became a significant item in organizational budgets. And like all questions concerning value, the first step is the precise determination of the object being assessed and the second step is the identification of the entity to which the value is beneficial. In software engineering both of these can be difficult. The p- cise determination of the object can be complex. If it is an entire information s- tem in an organizational context that is the object of interest, then boundary defi- tion becomes an issue. Is the hardware and middleware to be included? Can the application exist without any other applications? If however the object of interest is, say, a software engineering activity such as testing within a particular project, then the boundary definition becomes a little easier. But the measure of benefit may become a little harder.
 

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When I was working with the Software Engineering Institute (SEI)on Building Process Improvement Business Cases, I wanted to get a deeper understanding of the value of software, and how to include ... Read full review

Contents

Foundations and Frameworks
1
ValueBased Software Engineering Overview and Agenda
3
12 Background and Agenda
7
13 A Global Road Map for Realizing VBSE Benefits
10
14 Summary and Conclusions
11
An Initial Theory of ValueBased Software Engineering
15
22 A 4+1 Theory of ValueBased Software Engineering
18
Process Framework and Example
23
93 Research Approach
185
94 Survey Results and Analysis
189
95 Conclusions and Further Work
196
Collaborative Usability Testing to Facilitate Stakeholder Involvement
201
102 Usability Testing
203
103 Collaboration Tools and Techniques for Usability Testing
205
104 Research Approach
208
105 The eCUP process
210

24 VBSE Theory Evaluation
31
25 Conclusions and Areas for Further Research
33
Valuation of Software Initiatives Under Uncertainty Concepts Issues and Techniques
39
32 Issues in Valuation
40
33 Valuation of Uncertain Projects with Decision Trees
45
34 Real Options Theory
52
35 Summary and Discussion
60
PreferenceBased Decision Support in Software Engineering
67
42 Decisions with Multiple Criteria and Software Engineering
69
43 Multicriteria Decision Methods
71
44 Incomplete Information and Sensitivity Analysis
82
45 Summary and Conclusions
84
5 Risk and the Economic Value of the Software Producer
90
52 The Value of the Firm
92
54 Financial Risk
94
55 Prediction and the Value of the Firm
95
56 MultiProject Firms and Economic Value
96
58 Financial Risk and Software Projects
97
59 Predictability and Process Improvement
99
510 Arriving at a Risk Premium for Software Projects
100
511 Computing the Financial Value of Improved Predictability
101
512 An Illustrative Example
102
513 Conclusions
103
Part 2 Practices
107
ValueBased Software Engineering Seven Key Elements and Ethical Considerations
109
62 Stakeholder Value Proposition Elicitation and Reconciliation
111
63 Business Case Analysis
113
64 Continuous Risk and Opportunity Management
114
65 Concurrent System and Software Engineering
117
66 ValueBased Monitoring and Control
119
67 Change as Opportunity
122
68 Integrating Ethical Considerations into Software Engineering Practice
124
69 Getting Started Toward VBSE
128
Stakeholder Value Proposition Elicitation and Reconciliation
133
72 Negotiation Challenges
134
73 The EasyWinWin Requirements Negotiation Support
138
74 Possible Extensions to the EasyWinWin Approach
147
75 Conclusions
151
Measurement and Decision Making
155
82 Models of Measurement and Decision Making
156
83 Decision Making Behavior
162
84 Decision Making Behavior in Groups
166
85 Measurement and Analysis for Decision Making
167
86 Decision Support in a VBSE Framework
170
87 Conclusion
173
Criteria for Selecting Software Requirements to Create Product Value An Industrial Empirical Study
178
92 Background
181
106 Application of eCUP
213
107 Conclusion
217
ValueBased Management of Software Testing
225
112 Taking a ValueBased Perspective on Testing
226
113 Practices Supporting ValueBased Testing
233
114 A Framework for ValueBased Test Management
236
115 Conclusion and Outlook
241
Part 3
245
Decision Support for ValueBased Software Release Planning
246
122 Background
248
123 ValueBased Release Planning
251
124 Example
255
125 Conclusions and Future Work
258
ProSimRA Software Process Simulation in Support of Risk Assessment
263
132 Software Process Simulation
266
133 SPSBased Risk Analysis Procedure
269
134 Case Example
271
135 Discussion and Future Work
278
Tailoring Software Traceability to ValueBased Needs
287
142 VideoonDemand Case Study
290
143 TestingBased Trace Analysis
293
144 Trace Analysis through Commonality
299
145 The Tailorable Factors
302
146 Conclusions
306
ValueBased Knowledge Management the Contribution of Group Processes
309
152 Managing Knowledge
310
Postmortem Review and Process Workshop
313
154 Discussion
318
155 Conclusion and Further Work
322
Quantifying the Value of New Technologies for Software Development
326
162 Background
329
163 Applications
330
164 Impact Assessment Methodology
335
165 Results
338
166 Related Work
341
Valuing Software Intellectual Property
345
172 Software Intellectual Property Protection Mechanisms
346
173 Licensing
349
174 Valuation Process
350
175 Valuation Framework for Intellectual Property
356
176 Potential Uses of the Valuation Framework
363
178 Summary and Conclusions
364
Glossary
367
List of Figures
381
List of Tables
383
Index
384
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Dr. Stefan Biffl is an associate professor of software engineering at the Institute of Software Technology and Interactive Systems, Vienna University of Technology. He received his MS and PhD in computer science from the Vienna University of Technology and his MS in social and economic sciences from the University of Vienna. He is founder of the Quality Software Engineering research group (QSE) at the Vienna University of Technology. His research interests include project and quality management in software engineering, software inspection, decision support for software engineering processes, and collaboration among project stakeholders. He is a member of the ACM and IEEE.

Dr. Aybüke Aurum is a senior lecturer at the School of Information Systems, Technology and Management, University of New South Wales. She received her BSc and MSc in geological engineering, and MEngSc and PhD in computer science. She is the founder and group leader of the Requirements Engineering Research Group (ReqEng) at the University of New South Wales. She also works as a visiting researcher in National ICT, Australia (NICTA). She is chief editor of "Managing Software Engineering Knowledge" published by Springer in 2003. Her research interests include Management of Software Development Process, Software Inspection, Requirements Engineering, Decision Making and Knowledge Management.

Dr. Paul Grünbacher Associate Professor at Johannes Kepler University Linz and a research associate at the Center for Software Engineering (University of Southern California, Los Angeles). He studied Business Informatics and holds a Ph.D. from the University of Linz. Paul’s research focuses on applying collaborative methods and tools to support and automate complex software and system engineering activities such as requirements elicitation and negotiation or software inspections. He is a member of ACM, ACM SIGSOFT, and IEEE. He is General Chair of ASE 2004, the 19th IEEE International Conference on Automated Software Engineering.

Barry Boehm is known for four main contributions to software engineering. He was the first to identify software as the primary expense of future computer systems, he developed COCOMO, the spiral model, and pedegogy. Boehm worked at RAND, TRW, Inc, DARPA, and is currently TRW Professor of Software Engineering, Computer Science Department, and Director, USC Center for Software Engineering. Recent awards include the Office of the Secretary of Defense Award for Excellence (1992), the ASQC Lifetime Achievement Award (1994), and the ACM Distinguished Research Award in Software Engineering (1997). He is an AIAA Fellow, an ACM Fellow, an IEEE Fellow, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering.