Value by Design: Developing Clinical Microsystems to Achieve Organizational Excellence

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John Wiley & Sons, Feb 23, 2011 - Medical - 384 pages
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Value by Design is a practical guide for real-world improvement in clinical microsystems. Clinical microsystem theory, as implemented by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and health care organizations nationally and internationally, is the foundation of high-performing front line health care teams who achieve exceptional quality and value. These authors combine theory and principles to create a strategic framework and field-tested tools to assess and improve systems of care. Their approach links patients, families, health care professionals and strategic organizational goals at all levels of the organization: micro, meso and macrosystem levels to achieve the ultimate quality and value a health care system is capable of offering.
 

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Contents

Partnering with Patients to Design and Improve Care
47
Improving Safety and Anticipating Hazards
87
Using Measurement to Improve Health Care Value
131
Starting the Patients Care in Clinical Microsystems
161
Designing Preventive Care to Improve Health
197
Planning for Responsive and Reliable Acute Care
221
Engaging Complexity in Chronic Illness Care
241
Supporting Patients and Families Through Palliative Care
277
Designing Health Systems to Improve Value
303
Index
335
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About the author (2011)

The Editors

Eugene C. Nelson, DSC, MPH, is director of Population Health and Measurement for the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and professor of Community and Family Medicine at Dartmouth Medical School and the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice. He is the recipient of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations' Ernest A. Codman award for his work on outcomes measurement in health care.

Paul B. Batalden, MD, is professor of Pediatrics and of Community and Family Medicine at Dartmouth Medical School. He is the associate director of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Leadership Preventive Medicine Residency, and teaches at the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and in the Jönköping Academy for the Improvement of Health and Welfare in Sweden.

Marjorie M. Godfrey, MS, RN, is codirector of the Microsystem Academy, instructor for the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Dartmouth Medical School, and a recognized national and international leader in health care improvement with interdisciplinary professionals.

Joel S. Lazar, MD, MPH, is assistant professor of Community and Family Medicine at the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and section chief and medical director of Family Medicine at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, where he also serves as director of quality improvement.

Companion Web site: www.josseybass.com/go/nelson

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