Valvedre

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SUNY Press, Feb 1, 2012 - Fiction - 222 pages
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An astonishingly modern novel, George Sand’s Valvèdre questions traditional Romantic representations of women and exposes the disastrous consequences such notions of femininity have for both male and female characters at a time when divorce was illegal. This first English translation by Françoise Massardier-Kenney shows Sand’s control of style and her understanding of the major tensions of early modern France: the role of women in society, the nature of motherhood, the relations between science and art, and the nature of prejudice.
 

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Contents

I
1
II
29
III
47
IV
67
V
91
VI
107
VII
129
VIII
151
Last Part
171
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Page xiii - Sand's critique of the church's role in the subjection of women and her mistrust in the alliance of women with the church is not original: it inscribes itself in the French post- Revolutionary tradition that long denied women political and civil rights because they were associated with the conservative power of the Catholic church.
Page xiii - He took a fancy to me, he found me beautiful, he wished to be my husband in order to be my lover...
Page xiii - Romantic notions of love and femininity as well as her allegiance to the dictates of the Catholic church are not contradictory since both are expressions of patriarchal structures that limit women's autonomy and are based on a denial of their ability to be rational.
Page xii - Romantic representations of women and exposes the disastrous consequences such notions of femininity have for both the male narrator and the female character. She...
Page xiii - Sand creates a female character who is strong and who dies, not because of her weaknesses as a woman but because she has embraced all too readily...
Page xii - Alida dies after being forgiven by her husband; the narrator is thus freed from his burden...

About the author (2012)

Françoise Massardier-Kenney is Professor of French and Director of the Institute for Applied Linguistics at Kent State University. She is the coeditor (with Doris Y. Kadish) of Translating Slavery: Gender and Race in French Women’s Writing, 1783–1823 and author of Gender in the Fiction of George Sand.

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