Vanity Fair: A Novel Without a Hero

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Bradbury and Evans, 11, Bouverie Street., 1848 - 624 lappuses
 

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444. lappuse - Moreover his mother made him a little coat, and brought it to him from year to year, when she came up with her husband to offer the yearly sacrifice.
288. lappuse - No more firing was heard at Brussels — the pursuit rolled miles away. Darkness came down on the field and city : and Amelia was praying for George, who was lying on his face, dead, with a bullet through his heart.
77. lappuse - MacWhirter is any relative. Your wife is perpetually sending her little testimonies of affection, your little girls work endless worsted baskets, cushions, and footstools for her. What a good fire there is in her room when she comes to pay you a visit, although your wife laces her stays without one : The house during her stay assumes a festive, neat, warm, jovial, snug appearance not visible at other seasons.
16. lappuse - ... coat with steel buttons almost as large as crown pieces, (it was the morning costume of a dandy or blood of those days) was reading the paper by the fire when the two girls entered, and bounced off his arm-chair, and blushed excessively, and hid his entire face almost in his neckcloths at this apparition. "It's only your sister, Joseph," said Amelia, laughing and shaking the two fingers which he held out.
621. lappuse - There it is with its head on his shoulder, billing and cooing close up to his heart, with soft outstretched fluttering wings. This is what he has asked for every day and hour for eighteen years. This is what he pined after. Here it is — the summit, the end — the last page of the third volume. Good-bye, Colonel. — God bless you, honest William ! — Farewell, dear Amelia. — Grow green again, tender little parasite, round the rugged old oak to which you cling ! When it was over, and Georgy...
1. lappuse - WHILE the present century was in its teens, and on one sunshiny morning in June, there drove up to the great iron gate of Miss Pinkerton's academy for young ladies, on Chiswick Mall, a large family coach, with two fat horses in blazing harness, driven by a fat coachman in a three-cornered hat and wig, at the rate of four miles an hour.
9. lappuse - The world is a looking-glass, and gives back to every man the reflection of his own face. Frown at it, and it will in turn look sourly upon you ; laugh at it and with it, and it is a jolly kind companion ; and so let all young persons take their choice.
546. lappuse - Cook lurks down before daylight to scour her pots and pans in the kitchen; by which young Master stealthily ascends, having left his boots in the hall, and let himself in after dawn from a jolly night at the Club; down which Miss comes rustling in fresh ribbons and spreading muslins, brilliant and beautiful, and prepared for conquest and the ball...
338. lappuse - It was as the abode of a fairy to him — a mystic chamber of splendour and delights. There in the wardrobe hung those wonderful robes — pink and blue, and many-tinted. There was the jewel-case, silverclasped : and the wondrous bronze hand on the dressing-table, glistening all over with a hundred rings. There was the cheval-glass, that miracle of art, in which he could just see his own wondering head, and the reflection of Dolly (queerly distorted, and as if up in the ceiling), plumping and patting...
479. lappuse - Throw them down," he said, and she dropped them. He tore the diamond ornament out of her breast, and flung it at Lord Steyne. It cut him on his bald forehead. Steyne wore the scar to his dying day. " Come up-stairs," Rawdon said to his wife. " Don't kill me, Rawdon,

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