Vanity Fair: A Novel Without a Hero, Volumes 1-2

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Bernhard Tauchnitz, 1848
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User Review  - TheEditrix - LibraryThing

Read the first couple of chapters last night and ARDSJDSG MY GOODNESS this is going to be so good. It's been way too long since I last read a Victorian classic. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - benuathanasia - LibraryThing

Ok, I'm not going to lie, by and large I have little idea what this was about (it was kinda like shoving four seasons of a television sitcom into one weekend...). That being said, I found it hilarious ... Read full review

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Page 107 - The darkness came down on the field and city, and Amelia was praying for George, who was lying on his face, dead, with a bullet through his heart. CHAPTER
Page 46 - orphan boy the lattice pass'd. And, as he mark'd its cheerful glow, Felt doubly keen the midnight blast, And doubly cold the fallen snow. They mark'd him as he onward prest. With fainting heart and weary limb; Kind voices bade him turn and rest. And gentle faces welcomed him. The dawn is
Page 316 - ever seen of it is the vast wall in front, with the rustic columns at the great gate, through which an old porter peers sometimes with a fat and gloomy red face — and over the wall the garret and bed-room windows, and the chimneys, out of which there seldom
Page 248 - and have made them subscribe to our doctrine too. We let their bodies go abroad liberally enough, with smiles and ringlets and pink bonnets to disguise them instead of veils and yakmaks. But their souls must be seen by only one man, and they obey not unwillingly, and consent to remain at home as
Page 59 - not Dobbin's. I was bullying a little boy; and he served me right." By which magnanimous speech he not only saved his conqueror a whipping, but got back all his ascendancy over the boys which his defeat had nearly cost him. Young Osborne wrote home to his parents an account of the transaction.
Page xi - of that lady's own drawing-room. "It is Mrs. Sedley's coach, sister," said Miss Jemima. "Sambo, the black servant, has just rung the bell; and the coachman has a new red waistcoat." "Have you completed all the necessary preparations incident to Miss Sedley's departure, Miss Jemima?" asked Miss Pinkerton herself, that majestic
Page 335 - the elder sister holding him up a bunch of flowers; the younger led by her mother's hand; all with red cheeks and large red mouths, simpering on each other in the approved family-portrait manner. The mother lay under ground now, long since forgotten — the sisters and brother had a hundred different interests of their own,
Page 349 - I am commissioned by Mr. Osborne to inform you, that he abides by the determination which he before expressed to you, and that in consequence of the marriage which you have been pleased to contract, he ceases to consider you henceforth as a member of his family. This determination is final and irrevocable.
Page 59 - his widow's) guardianship. And this famous dandy of Windsor and Hyde Park went off on his campaign with a kit as modest as that of a Serjeant, and with something like a prayer on his lips for the woman he was leaving. He took her
Page 341 - there. I am. My wife is as gay as Lady Macbeth, and my daughters as cheerful as Regan and Goneril. I daren't sleep in what they call my bed-room. The bed is like the baldaquin of St. Peter's, and the pictures frighten me. I have a little brass bed in a dressing-room: and a little hair

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