Vanity Verses

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F.B. Patterson, Publisher, 1876 - American poetry - 79 pages
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Page 53 - ST. AUGUSTINE. ••' In the realm of flowers, a perfumed land, Girt by the sea, by soft winds fanned, Ravaged by war in years grown old, Its former glory a tale long told, Stands the quaint old Spanish city. '• The scene of many a hard-fought fight, Of many a siege, when Spanish might Was o'er the land ; in its decay It hath a beauty to live alway, That quaint old Spanish city.
Page 9 - I'm sure they needn't feel so fine Above us all, for mamma says Their dresses aren't as nice as mine. And one's engaged ; so, just for fun, To make her jealous — try to win Her lover — show her how 'tis done." RESPONDS. — From hatred, envy, mischief, sin, Good Lord, deliver us. " To-day the rector is to preach In aid of missionary work ; He'll say he hopes and trusts that each Will nobly give, nor duty shirk. I hate to give, but then one must, You know we have a forward seat. . People can see—...
Page 54 - • The scene of many a hard-fought fight, Of many a siege, when Spanish might Was o'er the land ; in its decay It hath a beauty to live alway, That quaint old Spanish city. " There 'sa charm in the ancient narrow street, Where lovely dames erst walked to meet Cavaliers in the days gone by, When strife of valor and love ran high, In the quaint old Spanish city.
Page 54 - sa charm in the ancient narrow street, Where lovely dames erst walked to meet Cavaliers in the days gone by, When strife of valor and love ran high, In the quaint old Spanish city." On the way from Florida to New Orleans, Mrs. Cartmell spoke of a New England poet by the name of Brownell. " What has he written, Mamma? " Nellie asked. " I remember three of his poems, —
Page 8 - We're not obliged to sit to-day Behind those horrid Smith girls — well, I'm glad they go so soon away. How does this cushion match my dress ? I think it looks quite charmingly." Bowed sweetly to the Smith's, " Oh ! yes—" RESPONDS. — Pride, vanity, hypocrisy. Good Lord, deliver us.
Page 55 - sa charm in the convent's crumbling wall; In old cathedral, with turret tall, With moss-grown roof, and merry chime, Man outliving, defying time, In the quaint old Spanish city. There 'sa charm in the...
Page 58 - sa friend of my sister Fan ; Her room joins mine, and the walls are thin. So I by accident heard them plan Their dresses for masquerading in. The ball was lovely, the costumes fine, And either dancing or iced champagne —Can't say which, but expect the wine— Just a little confused my brain. So, meeting Laura—a gypsy maid—, —Knew her at once by her dress, you see,— I took her out for a promenade On the piazza alone with me. MASKED BATTERIES. 'Flirted...
Page 59 - Flirted' ?' Said I was deep in love, Madly worshipped the ground she trod, Vowed it by all below, above; Did she return it ?—a word, a nod ? The fair head...
Page 10 - ... Will nobly give, nor duty shirk. I hate to give. But then one must, You know we have a forward seat; People can see,—they will, I trust— [Responds} . . ' From want of charity, deceit, Good Lord, deliver us.
Page 59 - By Jove ! Old- boy, it was my sister ! Laugh at me, Joe ! Don't spare my pride, Nor mind my feelings,—I feel so glad It was my sister, not Laura Clyde ; Heavens ! What an escape I had !

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