Variety: The Life of a Roman Concept

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University of Chicago Press, Mar 8, 2016 - Literary Criticism - 243 pages
The idea of variety may seem too diffuse, obvious, or nebulous to be worth scrutinizing, but modern usage masks the rich history of the term. This book examines the meaning, value, and practice of variety from the vantage point of Latin literature and its reception and reveals the enduring importance of the concept up to the present day.

William Fitzgerald looks at the definition and use of the Latin term varietas and how it has played out in different works and with different authors. He shows that, starting with the Romans, variety has played a key role in our thinking about nature, rhetoric, creativity, pleasure, aesthetics, and empire. From the lyric to elegy and satire, the concept of variety has helped to characterize and distinguish different genres. Arguing that the ancient Roman ideas and controversies about the value of variety have had a significant afterlife up to our own time, Fitzgerald reveals how modern understandings of diversity and choice derive from what is ultimately an ancient concept.
 

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Contents

Rescuing Variety
1
1 Words and Meanings
12
2 Varietys Contexts
31
Varietas in Pliny the Younger Lucretius and Horace
84
Listing Subjectivity and Genre in Latin Poetry
116
Variety and the Book
149
Conclusion
196
Notes
203
Bibliography
231
Index
241
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About the author (2016)

William Fitzgerald is professor of Latin language and literature at King's College London. He is the author of several books, including Martial: The World of the Epigram, also published by the University of Chicago Press.

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