Veering: A Theory of Literature

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Edinburgh University Press, 2011 - Literary Criticism - 221 pages
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Contrary to a widespread sense that literature has become increasingly irrelevant to our culture and everyday life, Royle brilliantly traces a strangely compelling 'literary turn'. Starting with an 'Advertisement' (which literally, of course, means a 'turning towards') like an 18th-century novel, he explores images of swerving, loss of control, digressing and deviating to form this new theory of literature. Royle's study ranges from Montaigne to Stephen King, from the 'dance of atoms' in Lucretius to the 'human veer' in Don DeLillo. With wit and irony he investigates 'veering' in the writings of Jonson, Milton, Dryden, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Melville, Hardy, Proust, Lawrence, Bowen, J.H. Prynne and many others. Veering provides new critical perspectives on all major literary genres: the novel, poetry, drama, the short story and the essay, as well as 'creative writing'. Key Features yA bold new theory of literature yWorks with insights from Lewis Carroll, Freud, Adorno, Raymond Williams, Edward Said, Deleuze, Cixous and Derrida yThe first critically integrated account of the role of creative writing in the humanities today, as well as a demonstration of its potential value and pleasure.

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About the author (2011)

Nicholas Royle is Professor of English at the University of Sussex. He is the author of many acclaimed books, including Telepathy and Literature (1991), The Uncanny (2003), In Memory of Jacques Derrida (2009) and (with Andrew Bennett) the influential textbook, An Introduction to Literature,Criticism and Theory (4th edition, 2009). He also writes fiction and has recently published his first novel, Quilt (2010).

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